Request Info
 

fbInstagramProgram Faculty

 

Rick Barton
Fredrick Barton

Fredrick (Rick) Barton is Writer in Residence and Research Professor, at the University of New Orleans where he was the founding director of the Creative Writing Workshop. He has taught in the summer abroad program in Madrid, San Miguel and Cork. He is the author or editor of ten books, including the volume of essays, Rowing to Sweden, the short fiction anthology, Monday Nights and the novels The El Cholo Feeling PassesCourting PandemoniumWith Extreme Prejudice and A House Divided, which won the William Faulkner Prize in fiction. His most recent novel, In the Wake of the Flagship is the story of a university's struggle to recover from a devastating hurricane. His many awards include a Louisiana Arts Prize; the Stephen T. Victory Award, the Louisiana Bar Association’s prize for writing about legal issues; the New Orleans Press Club's annual criticism prize 11 times; and the Press Club highest honor, the Alex Waller Memorial Award. In 2009 he was given an honorary doctorate for career achievement by Valparaiso University. In addition serving as academic director this summer, he will also teach Intensive Fiction writing. 

Scott Blackwood
Scott Blackwood

Scott Blackwood is the author of two novels, a story collection, and two narrative nonfiction books. His most recent novel SEE HOW SMALL won the 2016 PEN USA Award for Fiction, was named a “great reads” best book of 2015 by NPR and an “Editor’s Choice” pick by The New York Times. His previous novel WE AGREED TO MEET JUST HERE  earned him a 2011 Whiting Writers’ Award, the AWP Prize for the Novel, the Texas Institute of Letters Award for best work of fiction, and was a finalist for the PEN USA Award in fiction. The New York Times called his first book IN THE SHADOW OF OUR HOUSE  “acute, nimble stories…an impressive, accomplished debut.” Blackwood, a former Dobie-Paisano Fellowship recipient, has published stories and creative nonfiction in American Short Fiction, Gettysburg Review, TriQuarterly, Boston Review, Southwest Review, The New York Times,  Chicago magazine, and been anthologized in Janet Burroway’s Imaginative Writing.  His nonfiction piece, “Here We Are,” was nominated for a  2016 National Magazine Award for best narrative feature writing. Blackwood’s two narrative nonfiction books THE RISE AND FALL OF PARAMOUNT RECORDS, VOLUMES I & II—published by musician Jack White’s Third Man—tell the curious tale of a white-owned “Race record” label that began in a Wisconsin chair factory and changed American popular music forever, giving rise to some of the most influential Black voices of the 20th Century—Ma Rainey, Jelly Roll Morton, Alberta Hunter, Louis Armstrong, Blind Lemon Jefferson, and Charley Patton. Blackwood was nominated for a 2015 Grammy Award for his writing on Volume I and featured on NPR’s Weekend Edition, Sound Opinions, and in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, Rolling Stone and elsewhere. He lives in Austin, Texas and teaches in the MFA program at Southern Illinois University.

Mary Breen
Mary Breen

Mary Breen is a Lecturer at the University College Cork. Her main area of research in the last decade has been Irish Women's writing, in particular fiction and autobiography, and she has published in both areas. She is currently in the second year of a major three-year project on print culture in Ireland from 1770-1830.

 

Miles Harvey
Miles Harvey

Miles Harvey's books include the national and international bestseller The Island of Lost Maps: A True Story of Cartographic Crime. His current nonfiction project concerns a swindler with dreams of ruling the world. Tentatively titled The King of Confidence, it is forthcoming from Little, Brown and Company. Harvey teaches creative writing at DePaul University, where he is co-founder of Big Shoulders Books and editor of the oral-history collection How Long Will I Cry?: Voices of Youth Violence.