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UNO Ireland: Writing Workshops
& Creative Arts

June 19 - July 21, 2018


We are now accepting applications for Summer 2018! 

 

All courses listed at 4000/5000 level may be taken by both undergraduate and graduate level students.

The basic cost of the program includes tuition for six credit hours (two classes). Students may enroll in up to nine credit hours, or one class in each session, for an additional fee. When completing your online application, please select your first and second choice in each relevant section, keeping in mind that you cannot enroll in two classes that meet at the same time.

2018 Proposed Course Offerings 

Course Number
Course Title
Faculty
Syllabus
Open 
Section I Morning Session
ENGL6171 Intensive Fiction Writing Fredrick Barton    
ENGL 4161/5161 Advanced Fiction Writing Nicholas Mainieri    
ENGL 2161 Intro to Fiction Writing Jarred Marlatt    

FTA 6207/6257

Intensive Scriptwriting

Cavan Hallman    
FTA 4200/4251 Advanced Scriptwriting Cavan Hallman    

ENGL 4918/5918

Creative Nonfiction Literature: Ireland through Travel Literature

Kim McDonald    
 
Section II Afternoon Session
ENGL 6174 Intensive Nonfiction Writing  Kristen Iversen    
ENGL 4154 Advanced Nonfiction Writing  TBA    
ENGL 4380/5380 Irish Literature & Culture  Mary Breen    
FTA 4330/5330 Acting Styles Cavan Hallman    
 ENGL 4391.2/5391.2 Spenser: Early Modern Colonial Enterprise and the Irish Response Shelby Richardson    
FTA 4096/5096 The Cork Project - Visual Storytelling on Mobile Platforms James Roe    
 
Section III Evening Session
ENGL 4391/5391 Crafting the Witch Shelby Richardson    
ENGL 4391.4/5391.4 Murder European Style Carl Malmgren    
FTA 4591/5591 Irish Republicanism in the Cinema James Roe    
 ENGL 6281 Composition Theory and Practice  Kim McDonald    
ENGL 4391.3/5391.3  Irish Poetry and Mythology         Kay Murphy    
     
Section IV Independent Study
ENGL 4391 or FTA 3090 Directed Study/Internship Varied    
ENGL 6397 or FTA 6090 Directed Study/Internship Varied    
ENGL 7000  Thesis Research  Varied    
All for-credit students will receive a transcript for their participation.  This official transcript can be sent to the appropriate home institution at the participant's request, after a final assessment and payment of room damages and other remaining charges.  If you have any questions about the transcript process, please feel free to contact the Writing Workshops Abroad office.
 

If you've already completed your degree, you might be interested in our non-credit Cork Writers' Retreat. The Retreat provides the opportunity for writers of all levels to create, revise, and join in as members of our vibrant artistic community. For information on our non-credit Cork Writers' Retreat, available to post-graduates and other non-degree seeking students please click here.

 

Course descriptions
ENGL 6171

Intensive Fiction Writing

A workshop in graduate fiction writing, taught in an intensive (short term) format, in residence. Intensive Fiction Writing is intended to assist aspiring writers to become better and more instinctive at their craft. Close attention is given to the structure and language that propel plots and make characters come alive. Students should have extensive prior experience in creative writing, or receive the written consent of the instructor. The course consists of four primary activities:

1. Writing stories (three per student)
2. Reading and discussing stories
3. Critiquing and annotating your classmates' work
4. Attending and participating in student readings.

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ENGL 4161/5161
Advanced Fiction Writing

A workshop in advanced fiction writing, taught in an intensive (short term) format, in residence. Advanced Fiction Writing is intended to assist aspiring writers to become better and more instinctive at their craft. Close attention is given to the structure and language that propel plots and make characters come alive. Students should have prior experience in creative writing, or receive the written consent of the instructor. The course consists of four primary activities:

1. Writing stories (three per student)
2. Reading and discussing stories
3. Critiquing and annotating your classmates' work
4. Attending and participating in student readings

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ENGL 2161
Introduction to Fiction Writing

 

ENGL 2161 is an introductory level workshop focusing on forms and techniques of fiction writing, taught in intensive (short term) format, in residence.  Students will write two short stories and provide constructive feedback for the works of their classmates.  Based on this feedback, students will revise one of their creative works. Readings of published works will introduce the formats and elements of fiction as well as provide common terminology and guidance for workshop critiques.   Each student will choose a published short story to analyze as a representation of at least one element of fictional craft and present this analysis to the class.  Students should try to read the supplemental stories and craft essays prior to arrival in Cork.

Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, each student will be able to identify and analyze elements of craft in fiction.  These elements will include developing character and voice, creating a complete narrative, understanding conflict and plot, and choosing and maintaining point of view. They will demonstrate this knowledge through annotation of their peers’ work, writing and revising their own creative work, and leading a discussion on craft elements in the work of a published author.

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FTA 6207/6257
Intensive Scriptwriting

This course is designed to enhance the student’s basic knowledge of the process of writing and developing a script for the stage or the screen, and to demonstrate and develop techniques for writing works intended for performance. Dramatic writing is fundamentally a collaborative art. This course will require students to work intensely with others in a workshop setting, in the rehearsal room, and in performance.

Each student will be expected to complete and revise either a full-length script, or a substantial one-act over the course of the semester. At least two weeks prior to our first class meeting in Cork, you will provide us with a clean first/initial draft ready for us to read and discuss. If you are generating a piece over the course of the workshop, an initial partial draft coupled with a thorough outline must be submitted at least two weeks prior to the start of the program.

In-class writings and smaller assignments will be utilized to assist in generating content, and to build skills in the areas such as, but not limited to: conflict, dialogue, sub-text, and structural unity.

In addition to the written assignments, your participation in workshop discussions, rehearsals both inside and outside of class, and at scheduled performances will be a vital part of your learning experience and grade. You will be expected to work directly with the actors and any other theatre artists contributing their time to the development of your pieces. All comments, interactions and responses are expected to be thorough and constructive.

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FTA 4200/4251
Advanced Scriptwriting

An advanced undergraduate course in the study and practice of writing original scripts for the stage or screen, taught in an intensive (short term) format. Students should have some prior experience with script writing or the creative writing workshop format, or receive the written consent of the instructor.

Each student will be expected to complete and revise either a substantial one-act over the course of the semester. The first five pages of a script, coupled with a thorough outline, must be submitted at least two weeks prior to the start of the program.

In-class writings and smaller assignments will be utilized to assist in generating content, and to build skills in the areas such as, but not limited to: conflict, dialogue, sub-text, and structural unity.

In addition to the written assignments, your participation in workshop discussions, rehearsals both inside and outside of class, and at scheduled performances will be a vital part of your learning experience and grade. You will be expected to work directly with the actors and any other theatre artists contributing their time to the development of your pieces. All comments, interactions and responses are expected to be thorough and constructive.

By the end of the summer term, students in this course will be able to: Further enhance the scriptwriting process as an advancement of previous work; develop their abilities to articulate and interpret authorial intent in their own works as well as the work of peers; demonstrate and develop techniques for writing works intended for performance; implement the collaborative process as it pertains to developing work for the stage and screen.

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ENGL 4918/5918
Creative Nonfiction Literature: Ireland through Travel Literature

Travel writing, like other genres of creative nonfiction, in Lee Gutkind’s words, are “true stories well told.” Combining an accurate recounting of experience and literary elements, writers throughout the ages have recorded their adventures and shared their journeys with readers. As travel has increased, so has travel writing, as well as its forms, functions, authors, and audiences. The first couple of days we’ll explore the travel writing in its extremes, from ancient writing to contemporary, serious to humorous, pragmatic to ecstatic, formal to irreverent, self-serving to audience-serving. Then we’ll focus on works about travel in Ireland, examining them as literary works and analyzing the incorporation of literary elements. We’ll also explore the ways in which these works serve as education for the reader/traveler, not only about people and place, but about history, geography, folklore, culture, and many other relevant subjects. We’ll read and compare multiple descriptions of some sites, and we’ll read about some of the specific locations we’ll visit as a group (or some that you may choose to visit on your own), experimenting with reading before, during, or after the visit to discover how this affects our experience with the place (and with the literature).

Assignments will include a journal (or blog) on the readings and your travel; two short essays developed from writing in the journal, and a take home final due at the final exam period.

Example Texts (Two book length readings—one or both might be from this list)

Rosita Boland A Secret Map of Ireland

Tony Hawks Round Ireland with a Fridge

Pete McCarthy McCarthy’s Bar

  1. M. Synge The Aran Islands

David Monagan Ireland Unhinged: Encounters with a Wildly Changing Country

A packet of short readings will be provided electronically or in hard copy

ENGL 6174
Intensive Nonfiction Writing

A workshop in advanced nonfiction writing, taught in an intensive (short term) format, in residence. Creative nonfiction writing describes real events, places, and lives using the techniques of fiction (character, dialogue, POV, and scene) and the elements of poetry (attention to language, associative leaps, experimental form). Creative nonfiction writers combine two contexts--the world of fact, and the techniques of literature--to tell a true story packed with information, grace, power, and clarity. Though we write from reality, literary nonfiction writers must learn to shape, finesse, and deepen. The focus is learning to write our experiences in such a way that others will want to read them.

Each student submits three pieces for the workshop, as well as critically reads the work of others and sample essays, providing written feedback and promoting discussion in an environment that is respectful and dynamic. Students are also expected to attend and participate in the student readings.

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ENGL 4154 
Advanced Nonfiction Writing

A workshop in advanced nonfiction writing, taught in an intensive (short term) format, in residence. One of the chief goals of the workshop is to hone the skills of critiquing, especially detailing what is strong and successful about a piece of writing. The better you are able to articulate why something works, the more likely you can own that technique yourself. Students should have prior creative writing experience, or receive the written consent of the instructor.  Coursework consists of:

    - Writing at least three works of literary nonfiction and significantly revising one of these.

    - Participating in workshop discussion and writing critiques of peers’ work.

    - Selecting, leading, and participating in writerly discussions of published literary nonfiction.

    - Attending and participating in student readings.

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ENGL 4380/5380
Irish Literature & Culture

This intensive reading course emphasizes primary texts and their representation of Irish culture and landscape over the last one hundred years. We will read many of the major Irish works of fiction and nonfiction of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. We will also pay attention to the complex and innovative narrative techniques that the authors employed in the construction of their novels and autobiographies. The class will give a general introduction to all of the novels, their structures and central themes, and also the historical and cultural settings from which they emerge. Students will be graded on two papers (one short, one long) a class presentation, and a journal recording the student’s reflections on the excursions.

Required texts may include stories, novels, memoirs, and excerpts by James Joyce, Elizabeth Bowen, Edna O’Brien, Molly Keane, Samuel Beckett, Colm Toibin, Seamus Deane, and John McGahern.

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ENGL 4391/5391
Crafting the Witch

The popularity of the witch as a literary and theatrical subject is undeniable.  From classical times, when witches like Hecate and Erictho made appearances in works by authors such as Euripides and Lucan, through the Enlightenment, concerns about witches and their craft were taken seriously by authors as well as the public at large.  Since women were accused and executed for suspected acts of witchcraft throughout Europe and North America from as early as the 1480s through the 1750s, their presence in literature and on the stage is perhaps unsurprising-- but their many representations often are. We will explore this subject as we read a variety of works that include characterizations of these remarkable figures. By examining fictional representations of witches in tandem with anti-witchcraft polemics, we will attempt to better understand why early modern people in particular felt witches posed such a real and dangerous threat to the community.  Through our study of literary works featuring witches, and supplementary material written on the subject of witchcraft, we will also consider what fictional depictions of witches tell us about the lives of the very real women persecuted for these “crimes”.

Texts:

Macbeth. (Ed. Catherine Rowe. Evans Shakespeare Editions. 2012). ISBN: 978-0495911203
Medea and Other Plays. (Ed. James Morewood. Oxford World’s Classics, 2009). ISBN: 978-0199537969
Penguin Book of Witches. (Ed. Catherine Rowe. Penguin Books, 2014). ISBN: 978-0-14-310618-0
Six Tragedies, (Ed. Emily Wilson. Oxford World’s Classics, 2010). ISBN: 978-0192807069
The Crucible. (Ed. Christopher Bigsby ) ISBN: 978-0142437339
The Odyssey, (Ed. Robert Fitzgerald.  Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1998). ISBN: 978-0374525743
Three Jacobean Witchcraft Plays. (Eds. Peter Corbin and Douglas Sedge. Manchester UP, 1986).ISBN: 978-0719019531

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ENGL4391.2/5391.2
Spenser: Early Modern Colonial Enterprise and the Irish Response

This course will explore a selection Spenser’s works written while he lived Ireland in the sixteenth century (1580-99).  The author of the first English epic poem, The Faerie Queene (1596), an allegorical work that celebrates the English nation, its ruler, and its language, Spenser was considered one of the greatest poets of his day.  Students will read the first three books of The Faerie Queene, exploring his tales of knights and monsters, warrior women and evil sorcerers while discovering the gorgeous Irish landscape in which the tale was actually written.  We will also try to make sense of the fact that Spenser also authored an infamous political treatise entitled, A View on the Present State of Ireland (1596), in which he castigated the Irish nation and its people and advocated strenuous and devastating actions against them.  How do we reconcile the English civil servant and plantation owner with the poet?  Although his Irish home, Kilcolman castle, in County Cork remains in ruins and his literary impact on more recent Irish poets and writers has been largely ignored, many Irish authors, including Seamus Heaney, have felt compelled to respond Spenser’s View.  In this course we will investigate the problematic connections between poetry, national identity formation, and colonial expansion as we read Spenser’s marvelously rich allegorical poetry.  Assignments will include weekly writing assignments, and a final research project, with an annotated bibliography.

Primary Texts: Spenser’s The Faerie Queene (Books I-III, A.C. Hamilton, ed.),  A View on the Present State of Ireland ( Hadfield, ed.) and the works of selected Irish authors including Heaney to be added

Secondary Texts (recommended reading): McCabe’s Spenser’s Monstrous Regiment: Elizabethan Ireland and the Poetics of Difference; Representing Ireland: Literature and the Origins of Conflict, 1534-1660

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FTA 4330/5330
Acting Styles

This course is designed to enhance a students’ knowledge of practical approaches to creating character and working within solo, scene, and ensemble environments, with a heavy emphasis on the concerns of developing new work. Classroom exercises and outside rehearsals will culminate in two public performances of works-in-progress created by the scriptwriting class in residence.

This course will enhance the creative writer’s public speaking skills; provide the emerging playwright or director with a greater understanding of performance techniques; and provide acting students a uniquely collaborative classroom environment. Subjects to be addressed include, but are not limited to:

  • Basic methods of warming up physically and vocally
  • The monologue
  • Ensemble and focus work
  • Physical-based approaches and “content-less” scenes
  • Script analysis from a performance vantage point
  • The collaborative process for writers and performers
  • Influence of early and “test” audience reactions on script development and performance

 

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FTA 4096/5096
The Cork Project - Visual Storytelling on Mobile Platforms

The best camera is the one that you have on hand. Smart phones and cheap, readily available video cameras have caused major changes in how we create and consume digital media. This course focuses on how we can use them to tell meaningful stories, and explores how accomplished filmmakers such as Robert Rodriguez and Sean Baker are employing them to create award winning films.

Students will learn the advantages and disadvantages to using these devices for narrative productions, and their importance in capturing documentary material in difficult shooting environments. We’ll study the aesthetic differences between their images and the images captured on large, professional cinema cameras, and we’ll analyze feature films and documentaries which successfully employed them in their productions. We’ll also discuss their current and future impacts on art, politics, and science, as well as their proliferation on social media platforms. As a practical component to the course, students will shoot multiple short documentaries, image essays, and narrative films in Cork. They’ll use the devices they have on hand—working within the confines of their inherent technical and creative limitations— to tell meaningful stories.

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ENGL 4391.4/5391.4
Murder European Style

This course will study a popular narrative genre, murder fiction, with a European twist. We will identify three different forms of murder fiction—mystery detective, and crime—and read classic European examples of each type.  Then we will turn our attention to two Irish novels to see where they fit in.  In so doing, we will look at the where’s and why’s and how’s that people commit murder in places such as England, Sweden, Norway, the Czech Republic, Italy, and Ireland.  We will also learn a lot about how murder fiction is written.

TEXTS (a limited number of novels to be chosen from the following list of authors): Arthur Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Stieg Larsson, Jo Nesbo, Patricia Highsmith, Philip Kerr, Tana French, Declan Burke, Ken Bruen.

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FTA 4591/5591
Irish Republicanism in the Cinema

This class examines the depiction of the Irish Republicanism movement in the cinema. We’ll study prominent feature films and television shows which explore the political upheaval and violence born out of the movement, and compare these depictions to historical accounts. We’ll also examine the cinema’s effect on the movement, and how it helped shape political opinion in Ireland and abroad. Films and television shows to be studied will include, 71, directed by Jack O’ Connell, Peaky Blinders, Bloody Sunday, directed by Paul Greengrass, and In the Name of the Father, directed by Jim Sheridan.

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ENGL 6281
Composition Theory and Practice

If your future plans include teaching at the college level, it is almost inevitable that teaching composition will be one of your responsibilities. Being able to demonstrate familiarity with the history of the discipline and the theories and research on writing and writing pedagogy that have shaped the field and that inform current practice will often give you an advantage when applying for a position, but equally important, it will make being asked to teach these courses much less intimidating. With this in mind, the course will focus on two major goals: introducing you to the writers, researchers, and theories behind modern composition, and arming you with pedagogical knowledge and approaches for teaching composition classes. This is the course graduate students applying for teaching assistantships at UNO are required to take prior to teaching, and it fulfills similar requirements at many other institutions.

Assignments will include weekly participatory activities (classroom practice) such as teaching demonstrations, role-playing exercises, reading facilitations (short written material of 1-2 pages will submitted to accompany these activities). Other assignments will include developing a writing prompt and two week syllabus of reading and scaffolding assignments for a freshman writing class, assessment of a student essay (providing feedback for revising), an annotated bibliography (five to seven entries), and a philosophy of composition. Much of the preparatory work for these assignments will be completed collaboratively during class.

Texts:

One sourcebook or collection of sample course designs and syllabi may be required, but most readings will be provided in a packet (either electronically or in hard copy).

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ENGL 4391.3/5391.3
Irish Poetry and Mythology 
 This majority of this course will focus on Celtic Myths and Legends. But we will also study three Irish poets: W.B. Yeats, Seamus Heaney, and Eavan Boland.  William Butler Yeats, in my estimation one of the world’s finest poets, was also immersed in folklore. Since he is both a love poet and a “political” poet, we will read poems that address both of these themes.  Despite beheadings and other atrocities in the folklore, you will meet warriors and poets of great integrity. Some of the most significant works in the Western canon, such as King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, are Celtic in origin. The stories are as violent as any contemporary ones; the difference is that poetry always plays a major part in every hero’s life. If you are a fan of DC and Marvel comics and films, you won’t be disappointed. For here is a precursor to The Hulk, magical weapons, fantastic creatures, and ferocious and powerful women. Try to imagine how differently war might be fought today if the men and women had to read four tomes of poetry while learning to shoot before they were accepted into the military. 

Attendance and class participation are mandatory.

Required Text: Celtic Myths and Legends. T.W. Rolleston. ISBN-13:976-0-7607-8335-1  $9.95

Since there are two texts by this name, please note the author.

Because our time is short here, before you come to Cork you should read the Introduction and 

at least skim the first 4 chapters in your text. These chapters provide background information that will make understanding the stories much easier.  

All poems will be provided to you by email before the course starts.   You should download and print them before coming to Cork.  It is often difficult for at least the first week to get anything printed.

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ENGL 4391 or FTA 3090
Directed Study
/Internship

Admission by permission of Academic Director and advising professor. Qualifying undergraduate students may take 3 hours of Directed Study in the genre of their choice. Counts toward nine-credit summer course limit.

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ENGL 6397 or FTA 6090
Directed Study
/Internship

Admission by permission of Academic Director and advising professor. Qualifying graduate students may take 3 hours of Directed Study in the genre of their choice. Counts toward nine-credit summer course limit.

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ENGL 7000 
Thesis Research

Admission by permission of Academic Director. Qualifying UNO MFA students may take 3 hours of Thesis Research. Counts toward nine-credit summer course limit.

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For more information, please call or email us.
Office telephone: (504) 280-7345; or writingabroad@uno.edu