Graduate Programs in Liberal Arts

Applied Anthropology Track

The Department of Anthropology and Sociology and the Department of Planning and Urban Studies in the School of Urban and Regional Studies provide an Applied Urban Anthropology track within the Master of Science in Urban Studies (MSUS) degree program.

The Applied Urban Anthropology track allows students to gain significant background in applied anthropology through course work in cultural anthropology, cultural resource management, and preservation. Applicants must submit transcripts of prior academic work, Graduate Record Examination scores, a resume, a writing sample, and three letters of recommendation. Please refer to a detailed description of the program in the Master of Science in Urban Studies degree section in this catalog.


Arts Administration

The Master of Arts in Arts Administration is designed to prepare students for careers in arts management and cultural policy with emphasis on practical field experience. Core courses cover performing and visual arts, commercial entertainment and non-profit, and the gamut of established institutions, startup enterprises, and work with individual artists. Elective options allow students to explore areas of individual interest, taking advantage of the
culture-rich environment of New Orleans. A capstone internship synthesizes the knowledge gained. Courses are taught by leading experts in the field, and are scheduled to accommodate working students.

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts, Education and Human Development
Master of Arts in Arts Administration

  1. Students will understand and be able to apply the concepts, issues, and best practices in arts marketing, legal matters, development, community arts engagement, and public policy.
  2. Students will understand the basics of producing and exhibiting both performing and visual arts, in both mission- and profit-driven contexts.
  3. Students will hone their writing and public presentation to meet the wide range of communication demands of the professional arts manager.
  4. Students will be able to budge, track, and report on the financial outcome of events, and understand funding
    and the financial records of an organization.
  5. Students will synthesize class learning with practical experience by applying arts administration skills in actual working environments.

Admission

A student must be accepted by both the Graduate School and the Arts Administration Program. To be admitted to graduate studies in Arts Administration, a student must have:

  1. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university;
  2. A satisfactory score on the Graduate Record Examination or the Graduate Management Admission Test, waived for applicants with previously-awarded masters' degrees or higher.
  3. A grade-point average of 3.0 for both undergraduate and post-baccalaureate work, on a 4-point scale.
  4. Satisfactory academic standing at the last college or university attended.

In addition to the above, applicants will be expected to provide a written Statement of Purpose and three Letters of Recommendation. Work experience in business and/or the arts is desirable but not required.

Program Scope

The Program encompasses a full range of topics associated with the visual and performing arts business and cultural infrastructure, arts advocacy and public policy, and arts in communities. With faculty guidance, during the course of their studies students will choose and pursue areas of specialization and pursue a pattern of study best suited to their interests and career goals.

Degree Requirements

Students must earn 42 credit hours, including 6 credits from a supervised Internship.

Requirements are:

#1) Core required courses (10-3 credit hours each):

  • AADM 6223 Finance for Not-for-Profit Organizations
  • AADM 6501 Development Strategies for Arts Organizations
  • AADM 6502 Arts Administration: Legal & Business Applications
  • AADM 6503 Marketing the Arts
  • AADM 6504 An Overview of the Field of Theatre Arts
  • AADM 6505 Visual Arts for Arts Administrators
  • AADM 6506 Musical Overview for Arts Administrators
  • AADM 6601 Writing & Presentation for Arts Administrators
  • AADM 6603 Arts, Artists & Administrators
  • AADM 6605 Seminar in Arts Administration


#2) Electives (2, chosen from the following - credit hours each)

    • AADM 6607 Public Arts Policy and Advocacy
    • AADM 6609 Arts and Community
    • AADM 6246 Arts technology Overview
    • AADM 6900 Practicums (240 hours supervised internship) (maximum two per student)
    • AADM 6090 Independent study
    • Museum Studies courses in the SUNO Graduate School (cross-enrollment)
    • Approved alternative UNO graduate course


#3) Capstone degree requirements:

  • Comprehensive exams in the areas of Development, Marketing and Legal
  • AADM 6990 A supervised internship of 480 documented hours with an approved cultural institution (6 credit hours, including report and analysis)
  • Internship Report and Host Institution Analysis (non-thesis) presentation and committee defense

 

Financial Aid

Graduate assistantships are available through the Program to a limited number of qualified applicants each year.

Limited scholarships are available.

English

Master of Arts Programs

The Master of Arts program in English is designed to develop the student’s knowledge of literature and language and skill in literary research and criticism. Though it is aimed primarily at preparing students for further graduate study leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the program also provides training for teachers of English in secondary schools and colleges and offers the opportunity for rigorous advanced study in the humanities preparing qualified persons for nonacademic professions.

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts
Master of Arts in English

  1. Students will develop mastery of the field of English studies, including knowledge of the principles of writing and argument; of the principles of criticism and/or theory; and of the substance and detail of many primary literary works in both British and American literature.
  2. Students will develop advanced research skills, including the effective use and understanding of library resources and relevant online databases having to do with rhetoric, writing, and literature.
  3. Students will develop advance analytical skills, including the ability to analyze and interpret particular literary or rhetorical documents with the aid of applicable literary criticism, and literary and rhetorical theory.
  4. Students will develop graduate-level writing skills, to include the ability to formulate clear and forceful arguments that engage modern issues in criticism relating to particular literary and rhetorical works.

Admission

Admission is based on undergraduate and graduate GPA, GRE scores, and a statement of purpose. Applications are accepted at any time; students may enroll in any semester.

Master of Arts in English
Degree Requirements

The Master of Arts in English Program requires its students to take a number of core courses, to choose a concentration, to take the courses required for that concentration, and to complete 30 or 36 credit hours. Students who choose to demonstrate a reading knowledge of an appropriate foreign language are required to take a total of 30 hours to complete their degree. Those who do not choose the foreign language option are required to take a total of 36 hours to complete their degree.

The core courses are ENGL 6280, 6230 or 6231; one course in British Literature numbered 5000 or above; one course in American Literature 5000 or above; one course in writing or rhetoric numbered 5000 or above.

 

All students admitted to the graduate program will be referred to the Coordinator of Graduate Studies in English, who will guide each student in selecting and following a sound program of study suited to his or her needs and level of preparation. This program may, in individual cases, involve more coursework than is specified in the general requirements for the degree. In all cases, a minimum of 18 hours must be earned in English courses numbered 6000 and above. One three-hour Directed Study course (English 6397) may be counted toward fulfillment of this minimum requirement. For those students who select the thesis option, three hours of Thesis Research (English 7000) will count toward the 18-hour requirement.

All students must take a three-hour written comprehensive examination in one of the following fields: American Literature; British Literature; Rhetoric and Composition; Classical Rhetoric; or Professional Writing. Students may choose to take another comprehensive examination in another of the fields above; or they may instead write and defend a thesis. The M.A. thesis (usually 30-40 pages long) is written under the supervision of an advisor assigned to the student by the Graduate Coordinator. Credit for English 7000 (Thesis Research) is granted only after the candidate has passed a one-hour oral examination on the thesis administered by a committee appointed by the Graduate School and the thesis has been approved by the committee.


Online Master of Arts in English

The Online Master of Arts in English program at UNO requires its students to take a number of core courses, to choose a concentration, to take the courses required for that concentration, and to complete 36 credit hours. There is no foreign language requirement.

Core Courses

The core courses (15 hours of study) are: introduction to Graduate Studies in English (ENGL 6280); one course in British Literature numbered 5000 or above; one course in American Literature numbered 5000 or above; one course in Rhetoric numbered 5000 or above; and one course in Professional Writing numbered 5000 or above.

Concentrations

There are two possible concentrations, each requiring 9 hours of study, and a student must choose one of them.  They are configured as follows:

Concentration in Literature

A minimum of 9 hours of coursework in Literature.

Concentration in Rhetoric and Professional Writing

A minimum of 9 hours of coursework in Rhetoric and/or Professional Writing.

Additional concentrations may be added as the program grows.

Electives

Twelve additional hours of electives to complete the required minimum of 36 hours overall.

All students admitted to the UNO Online Master of Arts in English program will be referred to the Coordinator of Graduate Studies in English, who will guide each student in selecting and following a sound program of study suited to his or her needs and level of preparation. This program may, in individual cases, involve more course work than is specified in the general requirements for the degree. In all cases, a minimum of 18 hours must be earned in English courses numbered 6000 and above. One three-hour Directed Study course (English 6397) may be counted toward fulfillment of this minimum requirement. For those students who select the thesis option, three hours of Thesis Research (English 7000) will count toward the 18-hour requirement. All students must take a three-hour written comprehensive examination in one of the following fields: American Literature; British Literature; Rhetoric and Composition; Classical Rhetoric; or Professional Writing. Students may choose to take another comprehensive examination in another of the fields above; or they may instead write and defend a thesis. The M.A. thesis (usually 30-40 pages long) is written under the supervision of an advisor assigned to the student by the Graduate Coordinator. Credit for English 7000 (Thesis Research) is granted only after the candidate has passed a one-hour oral examination on the thesis administered by a committee appointed by the Graduate School and after the thesis has been approved by the committee. 

Although delivery of the courses designated specifically for this online program will be online, students will have the option of taking up to 9 credit hours of UNO graduate courses in residency, all of which will count toward completion of the degree.

Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts
Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Workshop

  1. Students will produce high quality/publishable creative work in the genres of either fiction writing, poetry, nonfiction writing, playwriting or screenwriting.
  2. Students will demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of literary techniques in the genre of study.
  3. Students will demonstrate mastery of grammatical rules and display ability to edit texts at a professional level.
  4. Students will analyze and display an expertise in the literature of their genre. They will articulate clear and complex ideas on both classical and contemporary writing in their field of study.
  5. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the craft elements at work in classic and contemporary literature.

Admission

An applicant is accepted for graduate work upon the recommendation of the creative writing faculty and subsequent admission to the Graduate School. Students must hold a bachelor's degree and must possess clearly demonstrated skills in a creative writing genre. Graduate Record Examination scores, undergraduate transcripts, a personal statement, and three letters of recommendation should be submitted. All applicants must identify the genre in which they plan to specialize and submit a portfolio of their writing in the genre (two plays of any length, a feature-length film script, two short stories or a 25-page novel excerpt, ten poems, two short nonfiction pieces, or a 35-page book excerpt).

Degree Requirements

Resident option

  • Completion of at least 45 hours of Film and Theatre, and English courses.
  • Fifteen hours of 6000-level course work in creative writing workshops, at least 12 of which will be in the thesis genre area. These required course are: for fiction writing English 6161; for poetry writing, English 6163; for nonfiction, English 6154; for playwriting, Film and Theatre 6200; and for screenwriting, Film and Theatre 6250.
  • Three hours in a craft seminar in their genre. These required courses are: for fiction writing, English 6945; for poetry writing, English 6943; for nonfiction writing, English 6940; for playwriting, English 6946; and for screenwriting, Film and Theatre 6060.
  • Any additional craft courses will count as electives.
  • Three hours in English 6154 (Nonfiction Writing). For students whose genre is nonfiction writing, a workshop in a genre other than nonfiction is required in place of the three hours in English 6154 required of students in the other genres.
  • Nine hours in background literature courses. Fiction, poetry, and nonfiction writing students will be required to take this in the literature of their genre.
  • Screenwriting and playwriting students must also take background courses in the literature of their genre, with the exception that up to six hours of this requirement may be taken in techniques courses in the Film and Theatre Arts Department.
  • A grade of B or better in all required course work.
  • Nine hours of electives. Chosen in consultation with the Director of Creative Writing, these elective hours will be expected to conform to a cohesive program of study.
  • An overall GPA of 3.0 in elective courses.
  • A creative thesis for which the student may receive six hours of preparation credit. The creative writing thesis will be prepared under the supervision of a committee approved by the Graduate School. The committee will ordinarily consist of three members of the graduate faculties of the departments of Film and Theatre and English. The thesis director and at least one other member must teach in the student's genre area.
  • A comprehensive exam in the student's genre area that will be prepared, administered, and graded by the thesis committee. It will concern itself with the literature of the student's genre area.
  • Students who hold master’s degrees from other UNO programs may apply for admission, but upon acceptance they must meet all requirements for the M.F.A. degree listed above. However, only 9 hours from prior master’s courses can count toward completion of the MFA, and all 15 required workshop hours must be conducted at UNO.

Financial Aid

Graduate assistantships are also available for qualified students in all Master of Fine Arts programs of study.

Low Residency Option

  • The Low Residency Master of Fine Arts is a unique option within the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing. Low Residency Master of Fine Arts students take all their courses off-campus, either at one of UNO's summer study abroad sites in Europe, or via distance learning. The program is a 45 hour terminal degree, with the curriculum centered on 18 hours of creative writing workshops, plus 12 hours of background courses, nine hours of electives, and six hours of thesis preparation; the required courses mirror the resident Master of Fine Arts degree.
  • Completion of at least 45 hours of Film and Theatre and English courses. 18 hours of which must be in residence.
  • 18 hours of courses 5000 level and above must be taken in residence (not online). This must include 9 hours of writing workshops.
  • A total of 15 hours of creative writing workshops (including those taken in residence) must be completed, at least 12 of which will be in the thesis genre area. The required online workshops are: for fiction writing English 6171 or 6191; for poetry writing, English 6173 or 6193; for nonfiction; 6174 or 6194; for playwriting, Film and Theatre 6207 or 6209; and for screenwriting, Film and Theatre 6257 or 6259.
  • Three hours in nonfiction writing are required of all students. For students whose genre is nonfiction writing, a workshop in a genre other than nonfiction is required in place of the three hours of nonfiction writing required of students in the other genres.
  • Three hours in a craft seminar in their genre. These required courses are: for fiction writing, English 6941; for poetry writing, English 6943; for nonfiction writing, English 6944; for playwriting, English 6946; and for screenwriting, Film and Theatre Arts 6060.
  • Nine hours in background literature courses. Fiction, poetry, and nonfiction writing students will be required to take courses in which the literature of their respective genre comprises the majority of the assigned readings. Screenwriting and playwriting students must take background courses in the literature of their respective genre with the exception that up to six hours of this requirement may be taken in techniques courses in the Film and Theatre Arts Department.
  • A grade of B or better in all required course work.
  • Nine hours of electives. Chosen in consultation with the Director of Creative Writing, these elective hours will be expected to conform to a cohesive program of study. Any additional craft seminars beyond the one “in genre” required as outlined above will count as electives.
  • An overall GPA of 3.0 in elective courses.
  • A creative thesis for which the student may receive six hours of preparation credit. The creative writing thesis will be prepared under the supervision of a committee approved by the Graduate School. This committee will ordinarily consist of three members of the graduate faculties of the departments of Film and Theatre and English. The thesis director and at least one other member of the thesis committee must teach in the student’s genre.
  • A comprehensive exam in the student's genre area that will be prepared, administered, and graded by the thesis committee. It will concern itself with the literature of the student's genre area.
  • Students who hold master’s degrees from other UNO programs may apply for admission, but upon acceptance they must meet all requirements for the M.F.A. degree listed above. Moreover, only 9 hours from prior master’s courses can count toward completion of the MFA, and all 15 required workshop hours must be conducted at UNO.

Film and Theatre

Master of Fine Arts in Film and Theatre

The Department of Film and Theatre offers the Master of Fine Arts degree with a concentration in Performance and Production. Students may elect to concentrate in Film Arts---Production, Theatre Arts---Performance or Design. The Department is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Theatre. Master of Fine Arts programs in Theatre Arts reflect NAST’s highest standards. The Master of Fine Arts is a terminal degree for students interested in pursuing careers in film production, theatre arts, and in creative writing. Areas of specialization in Film Arts and Theatre Arts include filmmaking, acting, directing, and design.

Admission

An applicant is accepted for graduate work in film and theatre arts upon recommendation of the graduate committee and subsequent admission to the Graduate School. Students must hold a bachelor's degree in film or theatre arts or must possess clearly demonstrated skills and creative ability in their field. Graduate Record Examination scores and at least three letters of recommendation should be submitted. All applicants must submit evidence of their ability in the proposed area of specialization. Auditions, prompt books, portfolios, manuscripts, video tapes, films, and other appropriate presentations are to be submitted to the department when application for admission is completed.

In addition to the requirements of the Graduate School, the following must be met:

  • Satisfactory completion of at least 60 hours of Film and Theatre Arts courses. With written permission of the department, the candidate may take up to six hours in a field outside the department.
  • At the completion of 18 or more hours of course work the student will be evaluated by the graduate committee. If the first year review demonstrates sufficient progress, the student will be invited to continue in the program.
  • A grade-point average of 3.0 or better is required in all course work.
  • Normally students must be in residence at least two semesters taking a full load of at least nine hours each semester. Summer sessions may not apply. Under special circumstances this residency requirement may be waived by the department. Upon completion of one-half of the student's required work, his or her major professor will be designated by the department. Ordinarily this professor will serve as chairman of both the examining committee and the publicly presented creative thesis project.

Degree Requirements 

Master of Fine Arts tracks in Film and Theatre Arts require the following 18 hour core:

6020 Form and Idea in the Media 3
6040 Performance and Direction 3
6060 Concept, Conflict, and Character 3
6910 Studio Thesis I 3
6911 Studio Thesis II 3
6912 Studio Thesis III 3
6005 Graduate Studies in Orientation 0

Master of Fine Arts in Film and Theatre Track in Film Arts - Production

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts
Master of Fine Arts in Film Production

  1. Students will be able to identify important works in a historical context and analyze and critique the significant schools of thought of film theory.
  2. Students will demonstrate advanced skills in developing, producing, and have ready for exhibition a short narrative film.
  3. Students will demonstrate advanced knowledge of film production.

The Master of Fine Arts track in Film Arts includes a 27-credit hour production core which exposes students to the broad processes of filmmaking. Six credit hours of Analysis provide an important theoretical and historical framework for film production. The remaining nine credit hours (Application Electives) may be used to apply knowledge and training to a special focus within the curriculum.

M.F.A .in Film and Theatre Track in Film Arts Production Requirements (27 hours required)
I. Production

5500 Film Development and Planning 3
6510 Narrative Film Production 3
6520 Narrative Film Postproduction 3
5530 Advanced Project in Film Production 3
5566 Sound I 3
5550 Cinematography 3
6565 Digital Theory and Application 3
6220 Screenwriting for Production 3
6580 Film Directing 3

II. Analysis (6 hours required)

5540 History of Cinema I 3
or 
5541 History of Cinema II 3
5545 Film Theory and Criticism 3

III. Application Electives (9 hrs. required) Select from list below.

5090-5095 Special Topics in Film and Theatre 6
5096 Special Topics in Film and Theatre 3
5460 Advanced Documentary Production 3
5551 Spring Film Crew 3
5555 Spring Film Production 3
5567 Sound II 1
5568 Special Topics: Visual Effects 3
5570 Advanced Film Acting 3
5575 Advanced Film Postproduction 3
5591 Film Styles and Genres 3
5600 Film Producing 3
5900 Internship in Film and Theatre 3
6001 Practicum in Production 3
6090 Directed Independent Study 3
6100 Visual Design for Stage and Screen 3
6240 Writing the Thesis Script 3
6250 Seminar in Screenwriting 3
6560 Directing the Documentary Film 3
6900 Graduate Internship 3

Master of Fine Arts in Film and Theatre Tracks in Performance (Acting and Directing) and Design

Master of Fine Arts program tracks in Performance and Design are intended to prepare our graduate students to successfully apply acquired skills to the art of theatre, make significant cultural contributions to their community, or become leaders in an educational environment aspiring to the highest artistic standards.

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts
Master of Fine Arts in Film and Theatre Track in Theatre Performance

  1. Theatre MFA Performance students will develop their acting/directing techniques.
  2. Theatre MFA Performance students will be able to apply theory in written and oral form.
  3. Theatre MFA Performance students will be able to apply knowledge of their specialty within the discipline of film.

Master of Fine Arts in Film and Theatre Track in Performance (Acting)

Degree Requirements
I. Production/Literature (12 hrs. required) Select four courses from list below:

5260 Styles in Theatrical Production 3
5400 Development of Theatre 3
5450 Advanced Studies in Modern Theatre 3
5455 Advanced Studies in Contemporary Theatre 3
6001 Practicum in Production 3
6090 Directed Independent Study 3
6420 Problems in Performing and Visual Arts 3
6460 Aesthetics of Script Analysis 3

* 5301 Voice Stylization may be substituted for three credits
** 5333 Stage Combat or 5831 Movement Applications may be substituted for three credits.

Master of Fine Arts in Film and Theatre Track in Performance (Directing)

Degree Requirements

I. Production (6 hrs. required)
Select two courses from list below:

5260 Styles in Theatrical Production 3
6000 Practicum in Research 3
6001 Practicum in Production 3
6090 Directed Independent Study 3
6240 Problems in Performing and Visual Arts 3
6460 Aesthetics of Script Analysis 3
6900 Graduate Internship 3

II. Literature (6 hrs. required)
Required:

5450 Advanced Studies in Modern Theatre 3

Plus select one course from the list below:

5400 Development of Theatre 3
5455 Advanced Studies in Contemporary Theatre 3
ENGL 5221 or 5222 Shakespeare 3
ENGL 5516 Beg. English Drama 3
ENGL 5916 20th Century Drama 3
ENGL 5716 18th Century Drama 3

III. Directing Area (30 hrs. required)

5300 Voice Training or 5301 Voice Stylization 3
6200 Seminar in Playwriting 3
6330 Acting 3
6380 Directing 6
6830 Stage Movement 3
Plus, two courses in any design area(s) 6
And, two courses from Sections II or III not previously chosen 6

Master of Fine Arts in Film and Theatre Track in Theatre Design

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts
Master of Fine Arts in Theatre Design

  1. Theatre Design MFA students will learn creative skills in the art of theatre design.
  2. Theatre Design MFA students will demonstrate competency in a broad spectrum of theatre theory and production.
  3. Theatre Design MFA students will have a creative Film arts understanding.

Degree Requirements

I. Production (15 hrs. required)

6001 Practicum in Production 3
6090 Directed Independent Study 3
6120 Scene Painting 3
6135 Rendering Techniques 3
5160 Lighting Crafts and Techniques 3

II. Literature (3 hrs. required)

5450 Advanced Studies in Modern Theatre 3

III. History (6 hrs. required)

6125 Development of Style and Form 3
6150 Development of Fashion 3

IV. Design (9 hrs. required)

6110 Seminar in Scenic Design 3
6140 Seminar in Theatrical Costuming 3
6170 Seminar in Lighting Design 3

V. Electives (9 hrs. required)

6140 Seminar in Theatrical Costuming 3
6170 Seminar in Lighting Design 3
6110 Seminar in Scenic Design 3
6090 Directed Independent Study 3
5455 Advanced Studies in Contemporary Theatre 3
ENGL 5521 Shakespeare 3
ENGL 5522 Shakespeare 3
ENGL 5916 20th Century Drama 3
ENGL 5716 Restoration and 18th Century Drama 3

Comprehensive Examination

Normally students may take the Comprehensive Examination no sooner than the term in which they have completed 36 hours of graduate credit. This examination will be both written and oral. At least three members of the graduate faculty, one of whom may be from a department other than Film and Theatre, appointed by the Graduate School, will administer the examination. Part of the examination will be devoted to questions based on the reading list and course work, and the remainder will be devoted to questions relating to the student’s individual area of specialization.

Publicly Presented Creative Thesis Project

The thesis project will be prepared under the supervision of a committee appointed by the Graduate School. This committee will ordinarily consist of three members of the graduate faculty of the department. After successful completion of the comprehensive examination, the candidate will submit a written prospectus for a publicly presented thesis project. The research and execution of this project will normally take nine studio hours. The Master of Fine Arts thesis project is designed to test the student’s skill and knowledge in his or her area of specialization. The project is subject to the graduate committee’s approval.

Students who have earned graduate credits in film, theatre, video, or its equivalent from other institutions may apply for admission into the Master of Fine Arts program. However, the maximum allowable transfer credit must conform to the Graduate School’s policy on extension and transfer credit. Transfer credit is subject to the graduate coordinator’s recommendation and approval by the Graduate School.

Financial Aid

Graduate assistantships are available to a limited number of qualified applicants each year.

Fine Arts

Master of Fine Arts in Fine Arts

The Master of Fine Arts program in Fine Arts is designed to provide professional training leading to a terminal degree in studio arts.

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts Master of Fine Arts in Fine Arts

  1. Professional Mastery of production modes - Students will master the production modes of
    their chosen medium in the context of contemporary artmaking by engaging in an independent and in-depth studio art practice.
  2. Conceptual Development - Concerted investigation of content in relation to material processes, conceptual concerns and contextual relationships to the state of contemporary art.
  3. Professional development as a practicing artist - Produce and verbalize a unified body of artwork through the installation of a professional level exhibition and thesis paper.

Admission

After a student has applied to the Graduate School, the application, images of work and letters of recommendation will be evaluated by the Committee on Graduate Studies of the Department of Fine Arts. To be accepted into the program, applicants must have an undergraduate degree and a high academic average in scholastic and studio work. Applicants who are admitted to the Fine Arts program will be assigned a sponsor by the Graduate Admissions Committee. The sponsor is a member of the Fine Arts Graduate Faculty who agrees to accept the responsibility of guiding the student through the program and who regularly teaches or exhibits professionally in the student’s major area.

Students who are deficient in certain areas may be admitted on a conditional basis. They must complete both the regular requirements and fulfill the conditions imposed by the Committee on Graduate Studies.
 

Degree Requirements

Students will be required to complete a minimum of 60 graduate credit hours, including six hours of thesis research. 30 hours must be in the major studio and 12 in the minor studio. 6 hours must be in graduate-level art history courses.

Midway through the program, the Master of Fine Arts student's eligibility for graduate candidacy will be determined by the Committee on Graduate Studies, who will arrange for an oral examination and review of the student's artwork.   Once a student is approved for candidacy they may proceed to the preparation of the written thesis and exhibition.

Financial Aid

Graduate assistantships are available to a limited number of qualified applicants each year.

History

The graduate program leading to the Master of Arts degree in history provides intensive training for well qualified students in both European and American history. It serves to prepare students for work elsewhere at the doctorate level, to provide training for teachers in the secondary schools, and to offer advanced study in the humanities for those interested in nonacademic professions.

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts
Master of Arts in History

  1. Graduate students will demonstrate active participation within the historical and academic community, thereby building scholastic and career skills.
  2. Graduate students will demonstrate mastery of the basic skills of historical research and writing.
  3. Graduate students will produce scholarly material that incorporates advanced integration of scholarly material and research skills.

Admission

Admission to the graduate history program will be determined by the department upon the basis of the applicant's personal statement, undergraduate transcripts reflecting a high level of undergraduate achievement (typically, a GPA of 3.0 or above), and two letters of recommendation from professors with whom the applicant has studied. For application instructions, protective students should consult the department's website; http://history.uno.edu/grad/

Degree Requirements

All candidates must complete a total of 30 credit hours, with at least 15 hours in courses at the 6000 level, a maximum of 12 hours at the 5000 level, and at least 3 hours of thesis research.

Required Courses

    1. History 6001 – Historical Writing and Thought.
    2. History 6002 - Historical Methodologies and Research Design.
    3. At least one history seminar from the following: HIST 6201, HIST 6301, HIST 6501, HIST 6601, or HIST 6803.
    4. History 7000 – Thesis Research.

Only grades of B or better will be accepted toward fulfillment of degree requirements. The department recommends enrolled students register every semester for HIST 6005 - Graduate History Forum.

The program will culminate with a thesis that demonstrates an appropriate level of skill in historical research and writing, as well as a comprehensive oral examination designed to test the student's general knowledge of history.

Concentration in International and Global Studies

This concentration focuses on global, transnational and comparative approaches to the history of our increasingly interconnected world. In addition to the core history curriculum, a limited amount of interdisciplinary coursework that accentuates the interaction of states, societies, peoples and cultures over time will be deemed applicable. This concentration prepares students for both advanced graduate study and for careers in education, international organizations, government and the private sector. Students must complete a total of 30 credits hours and successfully defend a thesis.

Required Courses:

    1. History 6001 – Historical Writing and Thought.
    2. History 6002 -  Historical Methodologies and Research Design.
    3. History 6201: Seminar in World History
    4. One additional 5000- or 6000 – level history course featuring significant international topics and material.
    5. Three additional 5000- or 6000-level courses in other disciplines. These courses must be designated by the History Department's Graduate Coordinator as featuring significant international topics and material relevant to the candidate's course of study.
    6. History 6992: History Internship
    7. Approved electives (3 hours) at the 5000 or 6000 level.
    8. History 7000: Thesis Research

Students internships may be performed in the United States or, preferably, at an overseas campus or other location abroad. Candidates for the International and Global Studies concentration must be certified as having a reading and oral proficiency in one modern foreign language. As with the standard curriculum, the concentration will culminate
with a thesis and a comprehensive oral examination.

Concentration in Public History

The concentration in public history is available to students interested in the practice and presentation of history for a public audience, beyond the academy. This concentration does not preclude pursuit of a doctorate in history, but it is designed to provide history students with the opportunity to use New Orleans as a laboratory in which to develop skills for work in museums and other public venues. The curriculum for this concentration combines history coursework with courses in the theory and practice of public history, and a three-hour internship at a local museum, archive, or library. Students in this concentration must complete a total of 30 credit hours in one of two tracks, culminating with a thesis and a comprehensive oral examination.

Local & Community Track

This track allows students to focus on historical issues of local and community interest. In addition to other coursework, students will be placed in an internship position at a local institution with the help of the internship coordinator.

Required Courses

    • HIST 6001 Historical Writing and Thought
    • HIST 6002 Historical Methodologies and Research Design
    • One seminar from the following: HIST 6201, 6301, 6501, HIST 6601, or HIST 6803
  • HIST 6008 Introduction to Public History
  • HIST 5008 Public History Methods or HIST 5012 Digital History
  • HIST 5603 Research in New Orleans History
  • HIST 6992 History Internship
  • Approved electives (6 hours) at the 5000 or 6000 level
  • HIST 7000 Thesis Research

Military Track

This track allows students to focus on issues pertaining to military history. In addition to other coursework, students will be placed in an internship position at a local historical museum or site with the help of the internship coordinator.

Required Courses

    • HIST 6001 Historical Writing and Thought
    • History 6002 History Methodologies and Research Design
    • One seminar from the following: HIST 6201, 6301, 6501, HIST 6601, or HIST 6803
    • HIST 6008 Introduction to Public History
    • HIST 5008 Public History Methods or HIST 5012 Digital History
    • HIST 5003 Modern Military History
    • HIST 5565 U.S. Military History
    • HIST 6992 History Internship
    • Approved electives (3 hours) at the 5000 or 6000 level
    • HIST 7000 Thesis Research


Financial Aid

Graduate assistantships are available to a limited number of qualified applicants each year.

Music

Master of Music Degree

The Department of Music offers the Master of Music degree with concentrations in Composition, Conducting (Choral or Instrumental), Jazz Studies, and Performances. The program of study requires a minimum of 33 graduate credit hours to include course work in the applied area, music theory, music history, electives in music, and participation in the graduate colloquium every semester of study. In addition all students must complete a
graduate recital (Conducting, Jazz Studies, Performance) or a half recital plus thesis (Composition).

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts
Master of Music in Music

  1. Students will demonstrate advanced skills of artistic self-expression and knowledge of repertoire through the creation of high quality music.
  2. Students will demonstrate the ability to employ research methodology appropriate for the advanced study of music in order to synthesize its historical and theoretical contexts.
  3. Students will demonstrate skills requisite for advanced aural, verbal, and visual analyses of music.

Admission

In addition to the University application an audition and interview are required.

A person may be admitted as a non-degree seeking students and then change majors once the audition requirement is fulfilled. However, students with non-degree status are ineligible for financial aid.

Master of Music Degree Requirements

  1. Completion of the Master of Music degree requires a minimum of 33 hours.
  2. At the end of the program, each student must successfully present a graduate recital appropriate for his or her concentrating.
  3. Students in the Composition concentration will also submit a large-scale original composition or a portfolio of shorter original compositions to the graduate school to complete the thesis component of this concentration.
  4. No thesis is required for students in the Conducting, Jazz Studies, or Performance concentrations.
  5. All courses are selected with the approval of the major advisor.
  6. Students must pass both written and oral comprehensive examinations during their final semester of study.
  7. Students are encouraged to participate in ensembles each semester of attendance. However, only 3 credits will apply toward degree requirements.

Master of Music Core Curriculum

3 Credits   MUS 6200 Music Research Methods and Materials

9 Credits   Music History and/or Music Theory

(A minimum of 3 credits in each area)

9 Credits   Applied Lessons

3 Credits   MUS 6990 Graduate Recital (Conducting, Jazz Studies, Performance)

or

MUS 6950 Half Recital [1 Credit]/MUS 7000 Thesis Research [2 Credits] (Composition Only)

0 Credits   Graduate Colloquium (Must be taken and passed every semester of study)

24 Credits Total core requirements

9 Credits   Music Electives (selected from 5000- and 6000-level courses in consultation with major advisor)

33 Credits Total for degree

Recommended courses of study for each concentration are available on the Music Department website at http://www.music.uno.edu/

 

Financial Aid

A limited number of graduate assistantships and scholarships are available to qualified students enrolling in the Master of Music degree program.

Master of Public Administration Degree

The Master of Public Administration program is a professional degree for leaders and analysts in public and nonprofit organizations.

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts
Master of Public Administration in Public Administration

  1. The program will ensure that all MPA graduates will have acquired the basic skills and knowledge required to function as leaders in the public and/or not-for-profit sectors.
  2. Students will demonstrate competence in conducting research in the discipline and communicating the result effectively.
  3. Student demonstrates they can: Formulate a mission statement for an organization Analyze the structure of an organization using appropriate theories and concepts Understand how important contextual factors (internal and external) influence management within the organization.

Admission

In addition to the University application for admission, applicants must provide 3 letters of recommendation from individuals with knowledge of their professional or academic background, a resume, and a personal statement.

Degree Requirements
Prerequisites

  • Economics – Micro or Macro (3 hrs)
  • Political Science or American Government (3 hrs)
  • Unmet prerequisites should be made up early in the program.

Overview

  • 42 total hours needed to complete the degree (excluding deficiencies or prerequisites)
  • 27 hours of required courses
  • 9 hours of electives
  • 6 hours of thesis research and a thesis, or 6 hours of capstone courses and a final project. All masters students must include at least 15 hours of courses numbered 6000 or above in their programs of study.

Required Courses

PADM 6001 Research Methods in Public Administration
PADM 6010 The Profession of Public Administration
PADM 6020 Bureaucracy and Democracy
PADM 6110 Public Budgeting
PADM 6160 Law and Ethics in Public Administration
PADM 6401 Administrative Behavior
PADM 6180 Human Resource Administration in the Public Sector
PADM 6410 Technology in Public Organizations
PADM 6201 Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation

Thesis/Final Project Option

Students must choose either the thesis or the final project option

Thesis Option

PADM 7000 Thesis Research (6 hours) plus the thesis. Thesis students may take Capstone I in lieu of three hours of thesis research.

Final Project Option

This is an applied project completed in conjunction with a public service job or internship while enrolled in PADM 6901 and 6902 MPA Capstone I & II (3 hrs each).

Nonprofit Leadership Concentration

The MPA program offers a concentration in nonprofit leadership (NPL). The concentration consists of 15 hours: NPL students must complete the following courses which are currently offered under the Special Topics course PADM 4800:

PADM 5222 Legal & Ethical Issues in the Nonprofit Sector
PADM 5223 Financial Administration & Development
PADM 5220 Overview of the Nonprofit Sector
PADM 5221 Collaboration, Partnership & Coalitions Building
PADM 5224 Nonprofit Leadership (Leadership and Courage)

NPL students must also choose the thesis or non-thesis (final project) option. Thesis students may take PADM 6901 MPA Capstone I (3 hours) and PADM 7000 Thesis Research (3 hours).

Graduate Certificate in Hazard Policy Studies

Course Requirements

PADM 6130-US Disaster Policy & Administration (core required) 3
Two additional courses from:  
URBN 5150 – Planning for Hazards 3
SOC 5875 – Sociology of Disasters 3
GEOG 5805 – Fundamentals of Mapping and GIS 3

Other courses as approved by the MPA program director.

Changes

Students should check with the Department of Political Science about any revisions approved for the program, but which may not be reflected in this catalog.

Romance Languages

Master of Arts Program

The Master of Arts in Romance Languages (French or Spanish Option) offers the student a concentration in one of two areas: language/culture/civilization or literature. The program prepares students for further graduate study leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and provides training for teachers of French or Spanish in secondary schools and colleges. It also offers the opportunity for rigorous advanced study in the humanities to qualified persons for nonacademic professions.

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts
Master of Arts in Romance Languages

  1. Students will develop cultural, linguistic, and critical thinking skills in Romance Languages (Non thesis option).
  2. Students will develop cultural, linguistic, and critical thinking skills in Romance Languages (thesis option).

Admission

To be admitted to graduate studies in Romance Languages, a student must present an undergraduate record which indicates a high standard of achievement, normally with an overall B average. In addition, the Foreign Language Department will review recommendation statement of purpose written in the target language. The Department of Foreign Languages may grant full or conditional admission. Students admitted on a conditional basis must fulfill the conditions imposed by the department in addition to the regular requirements for the degree. Students with the bachelor’s degree in fields other than French or Spanish may be admitted on this conditional basis and allowed to make up deficiencies.

Degree Requirements

  1. Language/Culture/Civilization
    1. 33 credits in course work with at least 15 in courses numbered over 6000 or 30 credits in course work with at least 15 in courses numbered over 6000, including up to 6 credits in thesis research.
    2. A “B” average in all courses.
    3. Satisfactory performance on a comprehensive examination (written and oral) which will test the student in three areas of linguistics/civilization and in one period of literature (areas and a period which he/she may select from those indicated in the Reading List for the Master of Arts comprehensive exam).
    4. Reading knowledge at the 2002 proficiency level of a second Romance Language (French, Spanish, Portuguese and Italian) or Latin.
  1. Literature
    1. 30 credits in course work with at least 15 in courses numbered over 6000, including up to 6 credits in thesis research or 33 credits in coursework with at least 15 in courses numbered over 6000.
    2. A “B” average in all courses.
    3. Satisfactory performance on a comprehensive examination (written and oral) which will test the student in three periods of literature and one area of linguistics/civilization (periods and an area which he/she may select from those indicated in the Reading List for the Master of Arts in comprehensive exam).
    4. Reading knowledge at the 2002 proficiency level of a second Romance Language (French, Spanish, Portuguese and Italian) or Latin.
    5. All students admitted to the graduate program will be referred to the Departmental Coordinators of Graduate Studies, who will guide each student in selecting and following a sound program of study suited to needs and level of preparation. This program may, in individual cases, involve more course work than is specified in the general requirements for the degree. For purposes of clarification, it should be understood that the descriptions of 6000-level courses in the pages below are only categorical and that narrowed topics are always chosen for study within these broad categories.

The comprehensive examination is designed to test the candidate’s knowledge of the language/culture/civilization or of the literature of his/her chosen field of study. The examination may be taken only after the candidate has passed the reading knowledge examination in a foreign language other than the major language area and has completed all of the course work. Ordinarily, the examination will be devoted to course work undertaken for the master’s degree.

The thesis is written under the supervision of an advisor assigned to the student by the Coordinators of Graduate Studies in Romance Languages. Credit for Romance Languages 7000 (Thesis Research) is granted only after the thesis has been approved by a committee appointed by the Graduate School and after the candidate has passed a one-hour oral examination on the thesis administered by this committee.

Financial Aid

Assistantships in the Department of Foreign Languages are available for a limited number of qualified applicants each year. Requests for application forms and for additional information should be addressed to the Coordinator of Graduate Studies in Romance Languages.

Sociology

The Master of Arts degree in Sociology provides advanced training for students and serves the employment needs of the larger New Orleans community. The dual mission of the program prepares students to pursue doctoral work in sociology and/or assists students in furthering their career goals through developing and upgrading research and analytical skills. The department offers a comprehensive program in sociology with special concentrations in the sociology of gender and environmental sociology.

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts
Master of Arts in Sociology

  1. Students will demonstrate advanced knowledge and analytical skills in core theoretical and methodological paradigms and within at least one substantive area of specialization.
  2. Students are able to employ a range of techniques and methods used to gain sociological knowledge.
  3. Graduates will be critical readers of both basic and applied sociological research.

Admission

Admissions criteria include a good undergraduate record, three letters of recommendation, and satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examination. Students may also apply for graduate assistant positions. Students having the bachelor’s degree in fields other than Sociology may be admitted, but are typically required to take an undergraduate theory course for which they receive graduate credit.

Degree Requirements

Master of Arts students in Sociology may pursue a traditional thesis option, an applied sociology option, or a non-thesis option.

Students who pursue the thesis option must complete a minimum of 30 hours of course work at the graduate level which includes a core of required courses and electives. They must prepare a thesis and pass an oral examination covering the thesis topic.

Students who pursue the non-thesis option must complete 36 hours of course work, including a required course in qualitative methods.

Students selecting the applied sociology option must complete 30 hours of credit, write a research report based on two semesters of work in a public or private organization and pass an oral examination covering the completed report.
 

Financial Aid

Teaching and research assistantships are available to qualified applicants each academic year, with a maximum appointment of two years.

The Department of Planning & Urban Studies

The Department of Planning and Urban Studies (PLUS) is a unit of the College of Liberal Arts, Education and Human Development. The School offers four graduate degrees: Master of Science in Transportation (M.S.), Master of Science in Urban Studies (M.S.U.S.); Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.); Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.); and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Urban Studies.

Master of Science in Transportation

The Master of Science in Transportation (MST) program prepares students with the knowledge base and skill sets needed for successful professional practice in the transportation industry, which includes careers in the public, private and non-governmental sectors.  Transportation professionals work for companies and agencies across a variety of modes serving the needs of moving passengers and freight.  The applied nature of the course work ensures students are prepared to make professional contributions upon completion of the program.  The program provides graduate students with the opportunity to engage with professionals through course assignments, capstone projects, and internships. 

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will be able to articulate in-depth knowledge about the history and function of freight and passenger transportation and current issues in local, state and national policy.
  2. Students will be able to apply quantitative data and methods to transportation issues. 
  3. Students will demonstrate professional communication and analytical skills. 

Overview

The MST will require a minimum of 33 semester credit hours of graduate course work in  core courses (18 credit hours), a concentration (9 credit hours), and capstone/thesis projects (6 credit hours).

The following core courses (18 credits) would be required for all students:

  • Transportation Seminar: TRNS 6010
  • Intermodal Freight Transport: TRNS 6020
  • Introduction to Transportation Planning: TRNS 6061
  • Environment and Energy: TRNS 6100
  • Transportation Policy & Administration: TRNS 6200
  • Applied Techniques for Transportation Professionals: TRNS 6062

 

Students must complete a 9-credit concentration in Transportation Planning, Transportation Administration or a self-directed concentration.  The two primary concentrations will utilize instructional offerings in the accredited Master of Urban Planning (MURP) degree program and the accredited Master of Public Administration.  Students may transfer up to 12-credits from outside UNO, which could apply to the concentration courses. Please see the university rules governing potential transfer credit.

Transportation Planning Concentration

Courses eligible for this concentration are MURP 5063, MURP 6620, MURP 6020, MURP 5160, MURP 6450, MURP 5050.

Other courses or a thesis option may be permitted with approval of the program coordinator

Transportation Administration Concentration

Courses eligible for this concentration are PADM 6020, PADM 6110, PADM 6160, PADM 6201, PADM 6401

Other courses or a thesis option may be permitted with approval of the program coordinator

Self-Directed Concentration

Three courses (nine credits) approved by program coordinator and faculty advisor

Students must complete a six-credit capstone sequence over the course of a year or the thesis option, with six credit hours of thesis research.

Capstone: TRNS 6901, 6902

Master of Science in Urban Studies, Master of Urban and Regional Planning, Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies

The highly interdisciplinary M.S.U.S. program offers training in a broad range of urban phenomena for persons who desire to enter such fields as cultural resource management, historic preservation, law, journalism, education, law enforcement, business, and other urban-related professions, or to further their study of cities and regions at the doctoral level. The M.U.R.P. program is fully accredited by the American Planning Association (APA) and consists of professional training in planning cities and regions with special emphasis on the social, economic, environmental, political and physical aspects of metropolitan areas. The objective of the program is to prepare students for planning careers in city, regional, state and federal agencies; private consulting firms; public service organizations; and other public or private institutions. The program of study leading to the Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies enables students of exceptional ability to undertake advanced study and original research in the fields of urban affairs, urban history and urban and regional planning. The doctoral program’s mission is to prepare students for careers in scholarly activity, applied research, and advanced policy analysis.

Admission for MSUS AND MURP Programs

The Department of Planning and Urban Studies faculty has instituted admission requirements for entrance into the MSUS and MURP programs in addition to those of the Graduate School, which include above average academic competence as evidenced in undergraduate work and Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. The Department of Planning and Urban Studies faculty will also take relevant experience into account, although it is not a specific requirement for application.

Non-Degree Seeking Students

Persons who are interested in taking courses offered by the Department of Planning and Urban Studies, but not seeking a degree, are encouraged to enroll as a “non-degree seeking student”. Consult the appropriate catalog or contact the department office for assistance.

Master of Science in Urban Studies

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts
Master of Science in Urban Studies

  1. Students will gain knowledge of the history and current state of urbanization urban phenomena in the United States and other countries.
  2. Students will develop in-depth knowledge in a defined area of specialization.
  3. Students will master the ability to read and understand both primary and secondary sources in urban studies.
  4. Students will become knowledgeable about both qualitative and quantitative research methods and analytical techniques.
  5. Students will gain and display competency in creating and communicating professional standards in their work.

Degree Requirements

The flexibility of the M.S.U.S. program has allowed students to pursue career fields that are emerging and may not be covered in more structured and traditional masters programs. There are strong subfields in Applied Urban Anthropology and Cultural Resource Management offered in conjunction with the UNO Department of Anthropology and Sociology, as well as Urban Planning and Historic Preservation subfields.

Overview

Thesis track

  • 33-34 total credit hours
  • 15 hours of core curriculum coursework
  • 15-16 hours of specialization coursework
  • 3 hours of thesis research
  • Thesis

Non thesis track

  • 36-37 total credit hours
  • 15 hours of core curriculum coursework
  • 21-22 hours of specialization coursework
  • Comprehensive exam

 

Prerequisite Courses

An undergraduate economics course and an undergraduate statistics courses are the prerequisites for the M.S.U.S. program.

Core Courses

Urban Core:

MSUS students must successfully complete two urban studies seminars at the 6000 level or above offered by the Department of Anthropology and Sociology or the Department of Planning and Urban Studies. Students may substitute courses from other departments with permission from the course instructor and the M.S.U.S. coordinator.

Each student must successfully complete one urban history course at the 5000 level or above offered by the Department of History and Philosophy.

Methods:

In addition to core course requirements, all MSUS students must complete at least one qualitative and one quantitative research methods course.

Substantive Areas

Depending on whether they have chosen to complete a thesis, students must successfully complete five or seven courses from one of the following substantive areas (students who opt to write a thesis must successfully complete at least three hours of URBN 7000 Thesis Research).

  • Applied Urban Anthropology
  • Urban Planning
  • Cultural Resource Management
  • Historic Preservation

With the graduate coordinator's written permission, a student may submit another substantive area.

Master of Science in Urban Studies: Applied Urban Anthropology Concentration

The Applied Anthropology track of the Master of Science in Urban Studies degree program provides students with training in qualitative research methods and valuable fieldwork experiences. Fieldwork may include cultural preservation management projects, historic archaeology, policy evaluation, folklore research projects and internships in local government and non-profit organizations. Graduates with the Master of Science in Urban Studies - urban anthropology degree will be well prepared to work professionally as well as continue in doctoral study.

Students should check with the department about any revisions approved for the program, but which may not be reflected in this catalog, or visit the department website at www.uno.edu/cola/planning-and-urban-studies

Master of Urban and Regional Planning

The Master in Urban and Regional Planning program prepares graduates for a wide range of careers in the field of planning. Planners can choose to work for governmental agencies, private consulting firms or nonprofit organizations. Their chosen career can target such issues as creating safe, attractive and healthy neighborhoods; providing affordable housing; and building accessible, efficient and environmentally friendly transportation systems. Students have the opportunity to pursue internships for academic credit with selected agencies and private firms while they are in school. This "real world" experience helps students to become more competitive in the job market upon graduation.

All M.U.R.P. students will be required to show proof of having completed at least an acceptable introductory-level statistics course and an introductory-level economics course before entering the program, or will be required to complete such a course during their first semester of attendance.

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts
Master of Urban and Regional Planning

  1. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of the history, theory, legal framework and professional practice of urban and regional planning.
  2. Students will demonstrate research and analytical skills relevant to planning practice.
  3. Students will demonstrate the professional skills required in the practice of planning including skills in the area of written, graphic and communication, plan creation and implementation, planning process methods, and leadership.

Overview

  • 45 ‑ total hours needed to complete the degree (excluding deficiencies or prerequisites)
  • 18 credit hours of required courses
  • 9 credit hours of courses in an area of specialization
  • Either MURP 6720 Practicum in Urban and Regional Planning or MURP 7000 Thesis Research (3 credit hours)
  • 15 credit hours of approved electives


Students should check with the department about any revisions approved for the program which may not be reflected in this catalog.

Master of Urban and Regional Planning: Areas of Specialization

Program Specializations

Students have a choice of five areas of specialization within the program. Each specialization requires 9 credit hours of coursework. The five areas of specialization are Environmental/Hazards Planning, Historic Preservation, Housing and Community Economic Development, Land Use/Urban Design, and Transportation Planning. Students may complete coursework in 2 areas of specialization.

Joint JD/ MURP Program

This program, unique in Louisiana, offers a combined planning degree and legal education through Loyola School of Law for those persons seeking a career in land use law and development. Applicants must apply separately and be admitted to the MURP program at UNO and to the Loyola School of Law. Normal degree requirements of each program are reduced by a common core of nine credit hours of approved elective courses that count toward both programs. The requirements for both degrees must be completed before either degree is awarded.

Financial Aid

Assistantships for nine months are available for a limited number of qualified applicants. The student will devote approximately half-time (20 hours per week) to research work. In addition, a number of assistantships are located off-campus in planning and planning related agencies.

Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies

Student Learning Outcomes

College of Liberal Arts
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies

  1. Graduates will demonstrate an ability to synthesize urban studies scholarship, apply existing knowledge to diverse urban and regional questions, and create original interpretations of urban and regional debates.
  2. Graduates will demonstrate to their ability to use urban studies scholarship for original policy analysis and to design applied research.
  3. Students will demonstrate sufficient advanced knowledge in a subfield along with relevant methods to make an original contribution to the body of urban studies knowledge.
  4. Students will demonstrate an ability to evaluate both qualitative and quantitative urban and regional scholarship

Admission

The program of study leading to the Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies program enables students of
exceptional ability to undertake advanced study and original research in the fields of urban affairs, urban history, and urban and regional planning.  The primary goal of the program is to prepare people for careers in scholarly activity, applied research, and high caliber policy analysis.  Although many graduates will undertake applied research and policy analysis outside of academic settings, the program provides a sound foundation for teaching and research in emphasizes command of the literature in a particular area of scholarship and mastery of the research skills necessary to make original contributions to that literature.

Students admitted to the Ph.D. in Urban Studies program will typically have a master's degree in urban studies, urban planning, public administration, anthropology, architecture, history, or a related discipline. In some cases students admitted to the program may be required to undertake additional preparation appropriate to their major fields of study or areas of specialization.

Admission requirements for the Ph.D. in Urban Studies program include a minimum graduate grade point average of 3.0, an undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 or higher, a score of 150 or higher on the quantitative reasoning portion of the GRE, a score of 150 or higher on the verbal reasoning portion of the GRE, and a score of at 5.0 or higher on the analytical writing portion of the GRE.  The admissions committee may relax some admission requirements if applicants' records show substantial professional or scholarly achievement. Minimum English language proficiency measures are available online at http://www.uno.edu/grad/admission-requirements.aspx

 

Degree Requirements

Students must earn a minimum of 72 semester credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree with a grade point
average of 3.0 or higher, including a maximum of six credit hours for dissertation research.  All courses must be approved by the Department of Planning and Urban Studies and the Graduate School. Students are required to earn a B or higher in all required courses. For their other courses, students will be allowed two course grades of C or lower. Students who receive a third C while in the Ph.D. in Urban Studies program must withdraw from the program.

Students may count up to 24 credit hours earned as part of a master's degree program and up to nine additional credit hours earned after receiving a master's degree toward Ph.D. in Urban Studies program requirements.  All previous coursework counted toward the Ph.D. in Urban Studies program requirements must be approved by the Ph.D. graduate coordinator and the Graduate School and, if approved, will be covered on a written comprehensive examination that all urban studies doctoral students must pass before advancing to candidacy.

Fields of specialization include
    1. Urban Affairs,
    2. Urban History, and
    3. Urban and Regional Planning.

Overview

72 credit hours beyond the baccalaureate degrees:

    • Core Curriculum (18 credit hours)
    • Research Methods (6 or more credit hours)
    • Research Competence (6 credit hours)


Major and Minor Fields of Study/Area of Specialization (42 credit hours)

Students choose from three major fields of study: urban affairs, urban history, and urban planning.  They select a group of courses that provide a foundation in the theory and methods of their chosen field and a set of additional courses that constitutes an area of specialization. Typically, foundation courses are completed as part of a previous master's degree program. Students who do not have a master's degree in their major field or in a related field should expect to take courses sufficient to demonstrate knowledge of the basic theory, concepts, and methods of their major fields of study.

Students select a group of courses that form an area of specialization within their major fields of study. As a rough rule of thumb, students should expect to complete at least 15 credit hours of coursework in their areas of specialization. The courses may be offered in the Department of Planning and Urban Studies or other departments at the University of New Orleans.

Students define their areas of specialization in consultation with a faculty advisor and the Ph.D. graduate coordinator. The courses must be mutually reinforcing and coherent; assure expertise in some body of knowledge, methods, or problem area; and provide students with adequate skills and knowledge to undertake dissertation research, teach, and carry out original research in their areas of specialization. Students are expected to develop knowledge of the body of relevant theory in their areas of specialization, usually by taking courses in the social sciences, history, or planning; demonstrate an ability to apply theory and methods to specific problems; and develop a general proficiency in research design and methods. Areas of specialization available to urban studies doctoral students include, but are not limited to, urban development, transportation, social policy, social and cultural change, public culture, public history, cultural resource management, and historic preservation.

Students may, at their own option, define a minor field of study. Within the minor field, students must complete at least 15 credit hours in a set of courses approved in advance by the faculty advisor and the Ph.D. graduate coordinator. (Students may have completed some of the coursework as part of a master's degree program.) Courses students complete in the minor field may constitute an independent body of knowledge, or they may support the area of specialization developed in the major field.

Students should check with the department about any revisions approved for the program, but which may not be reflected in this catalog, or visit the department website at www.uno.edu/cola/planning-and-urban-studies .