Courses of Instruction

Courses offered during the academic year covered by this Catalog will be selected from those described on the following pages. The course number is shown to the left of the Title. The significance of the four digit numbering system is:

First digit

  • "0" - indicates the course does not carry degree credit
  • "1" - indicates the course is taught at an introductory or freshman level
  • "2" - indicates the course is taught at an intermediate level or at an introductory level within a specific discipline; oftentimes require freshman level prerequisite completion
  • "3" - typically referred to as junior level or upper-division courses; indicates the course is oftentimes taught at a level requiring both freshman and sophomore level prerequisite completion
  • "4" - typically referred to as senior level or upper-division courses; indicates the course is almost always taught at a level requiring junior level prerequisite completion
  • "5" - those courses offered at the graduate level (typically in conjunction with an undergraduate level class but requires additional academic work)
  • "6" - those courses offered for graduate students only
  • "7" - those courses offered for graduate students only

Second digit

Many areas use the second digit to designate sub-areas within their areas. Otherwise the second digit has no significance.

Third digit

The third digit has no specific meaning except when it is the figure nine. A nine as the third digit means that the course content varies from semester to semester.

Fourth digit

The fourth digit has no specific significance unless it is the figure nine.

Courses numbered "1000" – "4999" are available for undergraduate students only. Graduate students should not enroll in undergraduate courses. Courses numbered in the "5000" range and above are available for graduate students only.

Shown on the same line with the Title of the course is the designation of the credit hours which the course carries. The credit hour value is generally based on the number of class hours per week. One hour of classroom work per week is usually valued at one credit hour. Some departments give one credit hour for two hours of laboratory work per week while some require three or more hours of laboratory work for one credit hour.

Normally, if the course consists solely of lecture, or lecture-discussion type meetings, the number of meetings per week will be the same as the credit hours earned for the course and no statement is made as to the type or number of meetings per week. In other situations, the type and number of meetings is usually stated.

The following are the different colleges and courses offered: