Friday, May 2, 2014

UNO Doctoral Student Wins Award from International Precious Metals Institute

 Taha RostamzadehUniversity of New Orleans doctoral student in chemistry Taha Rostamzadeh has won a $5,000 prize from the International Precious Metals Institute (IPMI) that will help support his research of very small gold particles. Rostamzadeh is seen here alongside a “glovebox” in the University’s "Solvent Box and Thermal Analysis lab" located in the Chemistry Building. A glovebox (or glove box) is a sealed container that is designed to allow one to manipulate objects where a separate atmosphere is desired. Built into the sides of the glovebox are gloves arranged in such a way that the user can place their hands into the gloves and perform tasks inside the box without breaking containment. Part or all of the box is usually transparent to allow the user to see what is being manipulated.

A University of New Orleans doctoral student in chemistry has won a $5,000 prize from the International Precious Metals Institute (IPMI) that will help support his research of very small gold particles. Taha Rostamzadeh, a native of Iran, will be presented with the Gemini Industries Student Award at the IPMI's 38th annual conference, held June 7-10 in Orlando, Fla.

Rostamzadeh's research involves the fabrication of gold nanoparticle arrays that form very small peapod-like structures. Such nanoscale structures are about 10,000 times smaller than a human hair and have the potential to be used in solar conversion, drug treatment or small circuit devices.

"This is a well-deserved award," said John Wiley, professor of chemistry and associate director of the Advanced Materials Research Institute. "Taha's contributions to this research have been essential. Such funding is greatly needed to continue this work."

Gemini Industries, the provider of the award, is a leading precious metals refinery based in Santa Ana, Calif. The company has presented the award annually to individual graduate students since 1981. Previous recipients of the award have included students from MIT, Princeton, Northwestern, Cornell and Brown.

Rostamzadeh works in John Wiley's group in the Department of Chemistry and the Advanced Materials Research Institute. The research into peapod structures was started in 2011 under the Louisiana Board of Regents Post-Katrina Support Fund.

UNO's Advanced Materials Research Institute is a multidisciplinary research institute that provides a unique opportunity to develop novel research ideas that ultimately involve the government, private and academic sectors in the conception and development of research programs.

 

Read More

UNO Researchers Develop Process to Make Microscopic Gold 'Peas in a Pod'
A Laboratory at the University of New Orleans Is Officially the Coolest Place in the South
UNO Hosts Annual Symposium on Advanced Materials Research
UNO Ignites Ingenuity with Summer Outreach Programs by Advanced Materials Research Institute