Current Course Offerings

You will use two forms each time you are advised, the Student Advising Form and the Permission Request Form.

Forms can be found on the Resources page

Step 1: The student advising form will help you and your adviser get a clear picture of where you are in your progress toward your degree. 

In addition to contact information, the Student Advising Form asks for 4 pieces of information:

  • Course Abbreviation
  • Course Number
  • Course Section
  • Teacher

Example: ENGL 6390 476 HEMBREE

Step 2: Once your adviser reviews your Student Advising Form, you will receive an email approving your choices or making alternate suggestions. You will enter your approved course selections on the Permission Request Form. All forms can be found on the Resources page.

You will receive an email when those course permissions are ready to be used on Webstar. You should use your permissions immediately to avoid losing them.


Spring 2015 (Semester 1110) Courses

Background Literature or Elective Courses

ENGL 5380-Studies in Irish Literature with Barbara Fitzpatrick
ENGL 6246- Drama as a Genre--Justin Maxwell
ENGL 6247- The Short Story as a Genre--Barb Johnson
ENGL 6700- The Novel of Sensibility & the Gothic--Barbara Fitzpatrick

Required Workshops (May also be taken as electives)

ENGL 6191-476 Remote Fiction Workshop — Neal Walsh
ENGL 6193-476 Poetry Workshop— John Gery
ENGL 6194-476 Nonfiction Workshop — Richard Goodman
FTA   6259 / 6209-476 Scriptwriting Workshop -- J.Maxwell

Thesis Hours

ENGL 7000-001--(Please indicate number of hours--3 or 6-- that you intend to take in the "teacher" box)*Reminder: Financial aid will only pay for a total of 6 thesis hours during the course of your program.

*Exam or Thesis Only

ENGL 7040-001--Shenk

*This course bears no credit and comes with only a small fee. It is meant for students who have finished all course work and who need to take the comprehensive exam or defend the thesis.


Course Descriptions

ENGL 5380: STUDIES IN IRISH LITERATURE

SECTION 476 Online B. FITZPATRICK

This course will explore the development of the Irish short story and novel from 1800 to 1995. The literature is "Anglo-Irish"—that is, written in English by Irish authors—and will be examined from the perspectives of Irish culture, history, and politics. We'll also compare recent film adaptations of My House in Umbria and Albert Nobbs with the original stories. Requirements include weekly written discussion responses via Moodle, a critical research paper, a mid-term exam, and a final exam. Graduate students will have added requirements, including a collaborative report and an annotated bibliography. This online course demands extensive reading, familiarity with Moodle, and an ability to work independently. Students are required to use the following editions of the texts.

TEXTS:
The Oxford Book of Irish Short Stories, ed. Trevor (Oxford, reissue 2010)
Edgeworth, Castle Rackrent and Ennui, ed. Butler (Penguin Classics, 1993)
Somerville and Ross, The Real Charlotte (Sanders, 1999)
Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, ed. Deane (Penguin, 2003)
O'Flaherty, The Informer (Harcourt, 1980)
Trevor, Two Lives (Penguin, 1992)
Various e-texts on e-Reserve

ENGL 6246: DRAMA AS A GENRE

SECTION 476 Online J. MAXWELL

This theory-heavy course will focus on the conceptual structures and aesthetic paradigms that shape contemporary, Western drama. While we will read a few dramatic texts to give us shared models, our primary focus will be on the philosophical exploration of the genre in and of itself. We will look at drama and performance from multiple professional and academic viewpoints. Consequently, we'll read how various writers, directors, and philosophers see the dramatic arts and how their vision shapes our own. These diverse viewpoints should provide academic students with a larger dramatic vocabulary, allowing them to enter into the broader contemporary discourse of the genre. Simultaneously, the course will give creative writers the chance to see the too-often-invisible theoretical context that intrinsically surrounds the creation and dramaturgy of new texts. After all, a knowledge of theory is the only way to know if new work is redundant or innovative.

 

ENGL 6247: THE SHORT STORY AS A GENRE

SECTION 476 Online BARB JOHNSON

This literature class is designed for fiction writers. We will examine short stories of various styles with a writer's eye toward identifying how they are constructed. Using craft essays to study the elements of fiction—plot, characterization, POV, narrative structure, style, etc.--students will learn to identify the underpinnings of successful stories and to use that understanding in their own written work.

Requirements: Each student will present both a craft essay and a short story, submit weekly craft summaries and story critiques, and several very short creative writing projects. Full forum participation is a critical part of this class, thus will be mandatory for a passing grade.

TEXTS:

Baxter & Turchi: Bringing the Devil to His Knees
Burroway & Stuckey-French, Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft (as near the 7th Edition as possible.)

 

ENGL 6700: STUDIES IN 18TH-CENTURY LITERATURE: NOVELS OF SENSIBILITY AND THE GOTHIC

SECTION 476 Online B. FITZPATRICK

An exploration of the development of the novel of sensibility in the latter half of the 18th century and the related evolution of the popular Gothic novel of the 1790s and later. Whether providing accounts of eyes streaming with tears or bodies thrilling with horror, novelists worked at arousing readers' affective responses. Through a combination of reading, lectures, and written discussion responses, we shall explore the theoretical, cultural, religious, and gender issues informing these works. We shall also consider critical reception of the novels, both contemporary and recent, including film adaptations of Clarissa, Sense and Sensibility, and Northanger Abbey. Requirements include written weekly discussion assignments, a critical research paper of 12-15 pages, an annotated bibliography, a midterm exam, and a final exam. Familiarity with Moodle and UNO email is a necessity. An online course makes heavy demands on reading and writing, so be prepared!

TEXTS:

Richardson, Clarissa (Penguin Classics, 1986)
Sterne, A Sentimental Journey (Penguin, 2002)
Mackenzie, The Man of Feeling (2d ed., Oxford World's Classics, 2009)
Austen, Sense and Sensibility (Oxford World's Classics, 2008)
Walpole, The Castle of Otranto (Oxford World's Classics, 3d ed. 2014)
Radcliffe, The Mysteries of Udolpho (Oxford World's Classics, 2008)
Austen, Northanger Abbey (Penguin, 2003)
Sterne, Tristram Shandy (Oxford World's Classics, 2009) Optional