Eisenhower Center Publications



The Korean War The Korean War
by Allan R. Millett.

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.
Publication Date: July 2007

 From the Publisher
"Although sometimes forgotten in the shadows of World War II and the Vietnam War, the Korean War has at last begun to get its share of historical scrutiny. This bibliography serves as an essential reference tool, guiding the researcher through the studies of the build-up to the war, its strategic aspects, the roles of China and the United Nations as well as the United States, and the events following the withdrawal of U.S. forces."

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Mao's Generals Remember KoreaMao's Generals Remember Korea  
by Xiaobing Li (Translator), Allan R. Millett (Editor), Bin Yu (Translator)

Publisher: University Press of Kansas
Publication Date: June 2001

Book Jacket
"Mao's Generals Remember Korea demonstrates that the PRC continues to draw military, diplomatic, and strategic lessons from the war it fought fifty years ago with the world's most powerful military force. It offers valuable insight into the Chinese way of war and the military mind of Mao that will be a rich resource for Asian and military scholars."

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Military Effectiveness - Volume 3: The Second World War - New Edition

Military Effectiveness (Volume 3)
by Allan R. Millett (Editor) and Williamson Murray (Editor)

Publisher: Cambridge University Press, 2nd Edition
Publication Date: September 2010

From the Publisher
This three-volume study examines the questions raised by the performance of the military institutions of France, Germany, Russia, the United States, Great Britain, Japan, and Italy in the period from 1914 to 1945. Leading military historians deal with the different national approaches to war and military power at the tactical, operational, strategic, and political levels. They form the basis for a fundamental reexamination of how military organizations have performed in the first half of the twentieth century. Volume 1 covers World War I. The other two volumes address the interwar period and World War II, respectively. Now in a new edition, with a new introduction by the editors, these classic volumes will remain invaluable for military historians and social scientists in their examination of national security and military issues. They will also be essential reading for future military leaders at Staff and War Colleges.

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Calculations: Net Assessment and the Coming of World War II

Calculations: Net Assessment and the Coming of World War II
by Williamson Murray (Editor), Allan R. Millett (Editor)

Publisher: The Free Press
Publication Date: September 2007

From the Publisher
In the 1990s our political world is returning to a multipolar international system, much like the system in place at the dawn of World War II. Then as now, the task of accurately evaluating our own and our enemies' capabilities has been essential for political and defense policy makers. In a multipolar world, in contrast to the bipolar world of the Cold War era, there are few sureties, and preparedness is critical. Today, we face many of the difficulties and dilemmas of the 1930s as we assess the abilities of nations to wage war and secure the peace. How did the seven major belligerent nations of World War II determine their own and their enemies' military capacity, and how did these assessments influence the decision to go to war or the attempt to avoid it? Calculations combines the perceptive scholarship of seven acknowledged experts steeped in the original documents of the period. The result is the first book to examine systematically how the governments of the United States, Great Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the Soviet Union evaluated their strength against their potential enemies and alongside their potential allies before and during World War II. Focusing not just on the projected performance of the armed forces or a "bean count" of military technology and hardware, net assessment takes into account the whole spectrum of economic, military and political power, ideology and leaders, and demonstrates how these factors interacted in charting a nation's course and determining its fate. The unique and fascinating perspectives provided by Allan R. Millett, Paul Kennedy, Earl F. Ziemke, Alvin D. Coox, Williamson Murray, Brian R. Sullivan, Steven Ross, and Calvin L.Christman recreate the world of the great powers on the eve of war by examining how international relations actually worked in the highly charged diplomatic and military arenas of the 1930s.

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Commandants of the Marine Corps

Commandants of the Marine Corps
by Allan R. Millett (Editor) , Jack Shulimson (Editor)

Publisher: US Naval Institute Press
Publication Date: May 2004

From the Publisher
From personal papers and official documents, prominent historians of the U.S. Marine Corps present essays on the twenty-seven commandants who served the Corps between 1775 and 1983. Collectively, their essays trace the history of the Marine Corps through the experiences of the Commandants and their support staff. Each essay describes a Commandant's personality and outlines his entire career with a focus on his term as Commandant. Frank assessments are offered of each Commandant's performance and historical significance. The authors include Victor H. Krulak, Edwin Howard Simmons, Joseph H. Alexander, Merrill Bartlett, and the editors. Introductory essays by Allan R. Millett provide a general interpretation of the history of the Marine Corps through the leadership of the Commandants and the organizational changes at Headquarters Marine Corps. Millett also outlines the contributions made by the Commandants serving since 1983. From the appointment of Samuel Nicholas in 1776 to John A. Lejeune in 1920 and Robert H. Barrow in 1979, this anthology of original essays is the first in terms of focus, research, and analysis to tell the story of the Marine Corps through the performances of its Commandants.

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For the Common Defense: The Military History of the United States from 1607 to 2012, 3rd Edition

For the Common Defense: The Military History of the  
United States from 1607 to 2012, 3rd Edition
by Allan R. Millett, Peter Maslowski, William B. Feis

Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Publication Date: September 2012

From the Publisher
Called "the preeminent survey of American military history" by Russell F. Weigley, America's foremost military historian, For the Common Defense is an essential contribution to the field of military history. This carefully researched third edition provides the most complete and current history of United States defense policy and military institutions and the conduct of America's wars. Without diminishing the value of its earlier editions, authors Allan R. Millett, Peter Maslowski, and William B. Feis provide a fresh perspective on the continuing issues that characterize national security policy. They have updated the work with new material covering nearly twenty years of scholarship, including the history of the American military experience in the Balkans and Somalia, analyzing the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan from 2001 to 2012, and providing two new chapters on the Vietnam War.

For the Common Defense examines the nation's pluralistic military institutions in both peace and war, the tangled civil-military relations that created the country's commitment to civilian control of the military, the armed forces' increasing nationalization and professionalization, and America's growing reliance on sophisticated technologies spawned by the Industrial Revolution and the Computer and Information Ages. This edition is also a timely reminder that vigilance is indeed the price of liberty but that vigilance has always been — and continues to be — a costly, complex, and contentious undertaking in a world that continually tests America's willingness and ability to provide for the common defense.

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Military Innovation in the Interwar Period

Military Innovation in the Interwar Period
by Williamson Murray (Editor), Allan R. Millett (Editor)

Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication Date: August 1998

From the Publisher
In 1914, the armies and navies that faced each other were alike down to the strengths of their companies and battalions and the designs of their battleships and cruisers. Differences were of degree rather than essence. During the interwar period, the armed forces grew increasingly asymmetrical, developing different approaches to the same problems. This study of major military innovations in the 1920s and 1930s explores differences in innovating exploitation by the six major military powers. The comparative essays investigate how and why innovation occurred or did not occur, and explain much of the strategic and operational performance of the Axis and Allies in World War II. The essays focus on several instances of how military services developed new technology and weapons and incorporated them into their doctrine, organization, and styles of operations.

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Book Cover: The General

The General: Robert L. Bullard and Officership in the United States Army, 1881-1925
by Allan R. Millett

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated
Publication Date: October 1975

 

 

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The War for Korea, 1945-1950: A House Burning

The War for Korea, 1945-1950: A House Burning
by Allan R. Millett

Publisher: University Press of Kansas
Publication Date: October 2005

From the Publisher
When the major powers sent troops to the Korean peninsula in June of 1950, it supposedly marked the start of one of the last century's bloodiest conflicts. Allan Millett, however, reveals that the Korean War actually began with partisan clashes two years earlier and had roots in the political history of Korea under Japanese rule, 1910-1945.

The first in a new two-volume history of the Korean War, Millett's study offers the most comprehensive account of its causes and early military operations. Millett traces the war's origins to the post-liberation conflict between two revolutionary movements, the Marxist-Leninists and the Nationalist-capitalists. With the U.S.-Soviet partition of Korea following World War II, each movement, now with foreign patrons, asserted its right to govern the peninsula, leading directly to the guerrilla warfare and terrorism in which more than 30,000 Koreans died. Millett argues that this civil strife, fought mostly in the South, was not so much the cause of the Korean War as its actual beginning.

Millett describes two revolutions locked in irreconcilable conflict, offering an even-handed treatment of both Communists and capitalists-nationalists. Neither movement was a model of democracy. He includes Korean, Chinese, and Russian perspectives on this era, provides the most complete account of the formation of the South Korean army, and offers new interpretations of the U.S. occupation of Korea, 1945-1948.

Millett's history redefines the initial phase of the war in Asian terms. His book shows how both internal forces and international pressures converged to create the Korean War, a conflict that still shapes the politics of Asia.

This book is part of the Modern War Studies series.

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Te War for Korea, 1950-1951: They Came from the North

The War for Korea, 1950-1951: They Came from the North
By Allan R. Millett

Publisher: The University Press of Kansas
Publication Date: April, 2010

Description:
In The War for Korea, 1945-1950: A House Burning, one of our most distinguished military historians argued that the conflict on the Korean peninsula in the middle of the twentieth century was first and foremost a war between Koreans that began in 1948. In the second volume of a monumental trilogy, Allan R. Millett now shifts his focus to the twelve-month period from North Korea's invasion of South Korea on June 25, 1950, through the end of June 1951 — the most active phase of the internationalized "Korean War."

Moving deftly between the battlefield and the halls of power, Millett weaves together military operations and tactics without losing sight of Cold War geopolitics, strategy, and civil-military relations. Filled with new insights on the conflict, his book is the first to give combined arms its due, looking at the contributions and challenges of integrating naval and air power with the ground forces of United Nations Command and showing the importance of Korean support services. He also provides the most complete, and sympathetic, account of the role of South Korea's armed forces, drawing heavily on ROK and Korea Military Advisory Group sources.

Millett integrates non-American perspectives into the narrative — especially those of Mao Zedong, Chinese military commander Peng Dehuai, Josef Stalin, Kim Il-sung, and Syngman Rhee. And he portrays Walton Walker and Matthew Ridgway as the heroes of Korea, both of whom had a more profound understanding of the situation than Douglas MacArthur, whose greatest flaw was not his politics but his strategic and operational incompetence.

Researched in South Korean, Chinese, and Soviet as well as American and UN sources, Millett has exploited previously ignored or neglected oral history collections--including interviews with American and South Korean officers — and has made extensive use of reports based on interrogations of North Korean and Chinese POWs. The end result is masterful work that provides both a gripping narrative and a greater understanding of this key conflict in international and American history.

This book is part of the Modern War Studies series.

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A War to Be Won: Fighting the Second World War, 1937-1945A War to Be Won: Fighting the Second World War, 1937-1945
by Williamson Murray, Allan R. Millett

Publisher: Harvard University Press
Publication Date: May 2000

From the Publisher
In the course of the twentieth century, no war looms as profoundly transformative or as destructive as World War II. Its global scope and human toll reveal the true face of modern, industrialized warfare. Now, for the first time, we have a comprehensive, single-volume account of how and why this global conflict evolved as it did. A War To Be Won is a unique and powerful operational history of the Second World War that tells the full story of battle on land, on sea, and in the air. Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett analyze the operations and tactics that defined the conduct of the war in both the European and Pacific Theaters. Moving between the war room and the battlefield, we see how strategies were crafted and revised, and how the multitudes of combat troops struggled to discharge their orders. The authors present incisive portraits of the military leaders, on both sides of the struggle, demonstrating the ambiguities they faced, the opportunities they took, and those they missed. Throughout, we see the relationship between the actual operations of the war and their political and moral implications. A War To Be Won is the culmination of decades of research by two of America's premier military historians. It avoids a celebratory view of the war but preserves a profound respect for the problems the Allies faced and overcame as well as a realistic assessment of the Axis accomplishments and failures. It is the essential military history of World War II-from the Sino-Japanese War in 1937 to the surrender of Japan in 1945-for students, scholars, and general readers alike.

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