Monday, April 20, 2015

Google “Security Princess” Visits the UNO Information Assurance Program

Parisa Tabriz has worked on information security for nearly a decade as the self-appointed "Security Princess" of Google. She started as a "hired hacker" software engineer for Google's security team. As an engineer, she found and closed security holes in Google's products, and taught other engineers how to do the same.

Join Us!

Google "Security Princess" Parisa Tabriz will visit campus on Tuesday, April 28 to deliver a Google Tech Talk entitled “TechTalk: The Hacker Spectrum: Tales of people that break things and how being hacker-friendly can lead to better security.”

The talk takes place at 11 a.m. Lindy Boggs Conference Center, Room 152.

All Computer Science and Engineering students are invited, but anyone with an interest in software development is welcome.

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Google "Security Princess" Visits the UNO Information Assurance Program

Today, Tabriz manages Google's Chrome security engineering team, where the goal is to make Chrome the safest way to browse the web, and generally improve security on the Internet. And this month, she visits the University of New Orleans’ elite information assurance program, which was named a Center of Academic Excellence last summer by the National Security Agency.

“Miss Tabriz, 31, is something of an anomaly in Silicon Valley. Not only is she a woman – a gender hugely under-represented in the booming tech industry – but she is a boss heading up a mostly male team of 30 experts in the US and Europe,” reads an article in BusinessInsider

“As such she has the power to choose her own title – and "Security Princess" is on her business card. She came up with it while attending a conference in Tokyo: ‘I knew I'd have to hand out my card and I thought Information Security Engineer sounded so boring. Guys in the industry all take it so seriously, so security princess felt suitably whimsical.’"”

Tabriz, who has been named a has been named a “Cyber Warrior Princess” by CNN and spoken with media outlets from BusinessInsider to CBS, will visit campus on Tuesday, April 28 to deliver a lecture entitled “TechTalk: The Hacker Spectrum: Tales of people that break things and how being hacker-friendly can lead to better security.” The talk takes place at 11 a.m. Lindy Boggs Conference Center, Room 152. All Computer Science and Engineering students are invited, but anyone with an interest in software development is welcome.

Tabriz will be joined by Sabrina Farmer, a Google engineer and an alumna of the UNO computer science department. Farmer, who sponsors a computer science scholarship at UNO, will be on campus for the UNO Women’s Center Scholarship Awards ceremony and will host an annual luncheon with female students in computer science.

Tabriz has the somewhat unique distinction of being featured by WIRED and ELLE in the same year. According to her bio, she enjoys “luring more people into infosec, making things, and climbing rocks.”

In this talk, Tabriz will share how she got into hacking at UIUC, her perspective on some of the motivations and methods of modern-day hackers, and why she thinks that in some situations, being hacker-friendly can lead to better software security.

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful.

“It's an enormous goal to accomplish and we need great people to help us achieve it!” reads an event invitation.

Cyber security, also known as information technology security, is the science of protecting computers, networks, programs and data from unintended or unauthorized access, change or destruction. This growing field is critical to operations in federal, state and local governments; military, corporations, financial institutions, hospitals; insurance companies; banks and other businesses that store vast amounts of information that must be kept confidential. Since 2010, the U.S. federal government alone has allotted more than $13 billion annually to cyber security.

UNO has boasted an elite cyber operations program for nearly a dozen years and last summer The National Security Agency named it one of five universities selected for the NSA's National Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyber Operations Program.

Since 2002, the University of New Orleans has been home to a cutting-edge information assurance program that has drawn national attention. The University's information assurance program is the only information assurance program in the state that has gained certifications from the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security.

Researchers have attained more than $5 million in grants and founded the Greater New Orleans Center for Information Assurance, a Board of Regents sponsored center, which boasts two state-of-the-art computer labs.

The NSA's National Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyber Operations program was "designed to cultivate more U.S. cyber professionals in an increasingly demanding and ever-changing global environment," NSA officials said in a release.

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